My Life In Pictures with Mathieu Bastareaud

first_imgFor so long the French centre was one of Europe’s brightest stars. After a stint in New York, Bastareaud reflects on his amazing journey. This first appeared in Rugby World magazine in April. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Roaring success: In MArseille, 2017 (Getty Images) Roaring success, 2017“This photo (the main image above) is from a Top 14 semi-final against La Rochelle, 
at the Vélodrome stadium in Marseille,” says Mathieu Bastareaud. “It was not a simple game, they played very well.“But they took a red card (Pierre Aguillon, tip tackle) when they were leading 15-6. We played well and won through a last-second drop-goal from Anthony Belleau. Big breath. It was very intense!”Early years: With stade Francais (Getty Images)Paris, je t’aime, 2008“It was a special time for 
me because I’m from a little city (Créteil) close to Paris, I was born there. I played for the biggest club in Paris, in front of my family and also with legends like Christophe Dominici, Juan Martín Hernández and Ignacio Corleto.In Dublin (Getty Images)“When I started training at Stade 
I was impressed. They helped me be more confident with my rugby. Paris remains a special club for me and for French people because the spirit of the team is very different.”Big breakthrough, 2013“This was Toulon’s first European Cup final (in Dublin) and one of my best memories on the pitch. People thought Clermont would win – and they almost did with world-class play – but after Delon Armitage’s try we had our first big trophy (16-15). From then we created something special.”Respect: After facing Austin (Getty Images)King of New York, 2020“I’d been speaking with a club in South Africa, but they took too long and I needed to secure my family’s future. Then Rugby United New York came in and I knew one of their owners from Stade before. I wanted to leave France and see a new culture. I didn’t know anything about the city, the culture.“I was excited to go somewhere I knew nothing about. So I said ‘yes’ quickly. It (was) 
a great opportunity and in two or three years Major League Rugby will be a great place for rugby.”Big kiss: With Huget (Inpho)Pucker up, 2015“It’s a good one, this. Yoann (Huget) knows that I will never express my feelings. Sometimes 
I am very happy inside but I will also look p***ed off or nervous!Sad day (Getty Images)“So he loves playing jokes on me. He knew the photographer was there and so he kissed me 
at that exact moment. I remember I ran after him after that!”World Cup misery, 2015“We took 60 points in the quarters. I was so disappointed about my Rugby World Cup. I expected to play better but I put a lot of pressure on my shoulders. I didn’t play as I wanted, especially against Ireland. I played badly, which is why I was on the bench here for New Zealand. I was so frustrated.“And when I got on the pitch they were already 30 points ahead. We have a saying, ‘Impossible is not French’. But when you play the 
All Blacks it can be impossible! I knew the World Cup was finished and you never know if you can play another one, so I was sad.”At home: Representing France (Getty Images)Test baptism, 2009“I was very nervous before playing Wales. I wasn’t in the team at the start of the tournament 
and didn’t expect to be capped. Maxime Mermoz got injured and they called me. My phone was ringing and I didn’t recognise the number, so I didn’t answer. For an hour I thought, ‘Who called me?’“Christophe Dominici was my coach at Stade then and he called to ask what I was doing. I was at home after training and he said, ‘Pack your bag, you’re with the French team.’ I thought it was 
a joke but I was so nervous.“I called my mother and she began crying, she was so happy. 
I phoned someone with the team to ask what to bring. ‘Just bring underwear and boots,’ he said.“I expected to be on the bench so when the coach (Marc Lièvremont) said I was starting, I was in shock. Dominici called and said not to be nervous, enjoy it.“I have good memories. Tom Shanklin was my opposite 13 and afterwards gave me his jersey. He said, ‘Don’t worry, I know it’s your first cap.’ It was a good present as I remember watching him in 2005 when Wales won the Grand Slam.”Here’s Jonny: With Wilkinson (Getty Images)Toulon too good, 2011“I wasn’t picked for the 2011 World Cup. It was hard because 
I wasn’t playing well, I wasn’t fit.“I lost myself along the way. At the Six Nations I was good but I needed to work harder, day after day. In Paris, you can get lost if you’re young and get famous. In Paris you can do anything, on any day, at any hour. Paris is the best city to lose your way!“I thought I needed a big change. I had to move club and change city, not stay in my comfort zone. Because even when I played bad I knew I’d play the next game.center_img “Philippe Saint-André was the coach at Toulon. I met him and then I said, ‘Why not?’ Toulon 
had won nothing but they were ambitious and had already signed Bakkies Botha and Matt Giteau, and Jonny (Wilkinson) was there. So I knew that it would be difficult to play, with a lot of good players. 
I accepted the challenge.“This was Jonny’s first game 
after the World Cup. He’d just got back and he could have gone on holiday, but he asked to play and I thought, ‘Whoah! That’s amazing!’ During my years with him, that was a good model for me.”New role: At No 8 (PA Images)Great eight, 2019“I could have stayed in Toulon if I wanted; it wasn’t the same as Paris, I chose to leave Stade, but in Toulon I was starting to be bigger than just a player. A new coach wants his players to play for him and sometimes we weren’t on the same page. So 
I preferred to move and let the club grow with a new coach, 
new players, a new chairman.“In Toulon the coach already asked me about playing No 8 and I said, ‘Why not!’ When I moved 
to Lyon, the coach said he heard about that and again I said, ‘I think I can play No 8.’ It would be a new experience, a new pleasure on the pitch, so he said, ‘Let’s go.’“It’s not the same. In the backs you have to run, tackle, take contact, but there’s rest. In the forwards it’s scrums, lineout, clear rucks, win collisions. You never stop. It’s not the same rugby!”Big mistake: In New Zealand in 2009 (Getty Images)A harsh lesson, 2009“When I think back to that tour of New Zealand, I was young and I needed to be more clever, to trust my team-mates, because 
I made a mistake. Like a kid who didn’t want to be caught, I lied (he fell into a table after a night out and damaged his face, but at first claimed he was jumped by five locals. He was sent home when CCTV footage later emerged). It was bad, then it was very bad when I came home. In France 
it was a big, big, big, big story.“The prime minister talked about it in the newspapers. A lot of people talked badly about me. That was very hard for me but more for my family. They knew 
I made a mistake but all those 
bad comments, for me it was 
too much for my mistake. I had killed nobody but then some journalists tried to go to my mother’s house, and they called my father with withheld numbers.“It was very hard for my family. But at the end of this story I think it made me stronger, in my head. After that I saw the real face of professional world rugby. I was on top but after two months people talked of me like garbage.”Tunnel vision: Leading France out (Inpho)Captain’s call, 2018“For me to captain France was very special for my family. I got sick before the game as I was so nervous. I had a lot of feelings.“I was thinking about ten years ago in New Zealand, I was thinking about my mother and father, I was thinking of my first training when I was a kid. I had 
all those feelings and I was so stressed. When you are captain 
of your club that’s fine. But when you captain your country, you represent all of your country.“To have this honour, it’s one of my best memories. Yeah, my mum was so proud because since I started she would support me through the good and bad and she always trusted me. So that was a good present for her.”Team building: Before the RWC (Getty Images)Mountain man, 2015“This was before the 2015 World Cup and we went to Tignes for a training camp. We went for a big hike, starting at 5am to be on the top of the mountain by 11. That was very hard! For the team it’s important to work hard together. We had a lot of fun together too.”Sharing a moment: With the Baa-Baas (Getty Images)Barbarian days, 2019“My first time with the Baa-Baas was in 2011. Every time someone asked me what it was like I said, ‘Amazing.’ So when they called to ask about the 2019 tour I couldn’t say no. This is the rugby I love – just take pleasure, share it with players from other countries, it’s great. I enjoyed my three weeks with the boys.“I wore a sock for Massy, my club before I joined Paris. It’s important for me to remember where I come from and I was with Massy three years. I learnt a lot and played my first season in the third division 
at 18 and it was really hard – it wasn’t rugby but a fight! That 
was good for me, mentally.”This feature with Mathieu Bastareaud first appeared in Rugby World magazine in April. Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

Mississippi diocese announces 5 nominees for bishop

first_img Submit an Event Listing Tags Featured Events Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest By diocesan staffPosted Mar 3, 2014 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit a Press Release Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Comments (3) Rector Smithfield, NC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Collierville, TN Comments are closed. Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Belleville, IL William A. Flint, PhD says: Mark Setzer says: This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Bishop Elections Mississippi diocese announces 5 nominees for bishop Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Shreveport, LA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET [Episcopal Diocese of Mississippi] The Standing Committee of the Diocese of Mississippi announced its slate of nominees for election as bishop coadjutor to become the 10th bishop of the Diocese of Mississippi. The announcement was made on Saturday, March 1.The nominees are:the Very Rev. Michael J. Battle, vicar, St. Titus Episcopal Church, Durham, North Carolina;the Rev. Marian Dulaney Fortner, rector, Trinity Episcopal Church, Hattiesburg, Mississippi;the Rev. Dr. R. Stan Runnels, rector, St. Paul’s Episcopal Church and Day School, Kansas City, Missouri;the Very Rev. Brian R. Seage, rector, St. Columb’s Episcopal Church, Ridgeland, Mississippi; andthe Rev. Ruth Woodliff-Stanley, rector, St. Thomas Episcopal Church, Denver, Colorado.A petition process for submitting additional names opens on March 3 and will close on March 7, 5 p.m. CST.  Complete information about the petition process and the petition form are available on the diocesan website.The slate is the result of a 10-month discernment process conducted by the Nominating Committee, made up of lay and clergy members representing all convocations of the diocese. The Nominating Committee was established and charged by the Standing Committee. With the announcement of the slate, a Transition Committee, also reporting to the Standing Committee and comprising lay and clergy members from across the diocese, implements the next stages of the election process.The nominees will be in Mississippi, April 7-11 and will be introduced at three open question-and-answer sessions. The sessions will be held at Coast Episcopal School, Long Beach on April 8; St. Andrew’s School, Ridgeland on April 9; and All Saints Church, Grenada on April 10.  While in Mississippi, the nominees will visit the John M. Allin Diocesan House, St. Andrew’s Cathedral, the Duncan M. Gray Camp and Conference Center and various ministries of the diocese.The election will take place on Saturday, May 3 at St. Andrew’s Cathedral in Jackson.  All canonically resident clergy of the diocese and lay delegates vote separately as “orders”; a majority of votes on the same ballot from both the clergy and lay orders is required for election.Pending consent from a majority of the Episcopal Church’s diocesan bishops and a majority of dioceses (via their Standing Committees), the consecration and ordination of the bishop-elect is scheduled to take place on Saturday, Sept. 27 at the Jackson Convention Complex in Jackson, with Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori presiding. March 4, 2014 at 11:35 am I’ve known Marian Dulaney Fortner for over 30 years. We first became friends during law school and then rented a house together while we were young lawyers. Marian has always been an inspiration to me and, probably not intentionally, made me want to be a better Christian. She woke up every morning in the wee hours to read morning prayer and then study the Bible. When she told me she wanted to become a priest, I was not surprised at all. She’s a natural! Now that she’s been nominated for bishop, again, I am not surprised at all. She’s smart; a natural leader; and exudes love to everyone she meets. She works very hard and, having been a lawyer, knows how to prioritize, and get things done. The most remarkable thing about Marian is that she accomplishes things without a bit of stress, at least to my eye. I encourage the voters to vote for Marianl I love her very much and I’m sure the diocese will too. Thanks for your consideration. Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem May Lipe Mintz says: Course Director Jerusalem, Israel TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Pittsburgh, PA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Martinsville, VA center_img Rector Knoxville, TN An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET April 4, 2014 at 9:18 am I like to have Marian Fortner as our bishop. I really appreciate her having the gay and lesbians together for a service, and I think that is wonderful. I approve same sex marriage in the churches and I hope she will let the priests bless the same sex marriage. I wish her luck! Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Washington, DC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Albany, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ April 29, 2014 at 4:16 pm Brian Seage is one of the most dedicated priest I have had the privilege to know. As rector of St. Columb’s, he was my priest. During a time when my father was so ill and dying, he was an ever present friend. I think Mississippi would be in good hands having Brian as their Bishop. He has done wonders working with the fine folks at St. Columb’s. The new Nave is a fulfillment of long years of dreaming and hard work. Thanks Be To God, the parish had Brian to lead them. Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Bath, NC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Press Release Service Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Tampa, FL Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Job Listing New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA last_img read more

Philippines: Mission in the midst of crisis

first_imgPhilippines: Mission in the midst of crisis Global partnerships deepen as typhoon response continues Rector Collierville, TN Director of Music Morristown, NJ Press Release Service Rector Tampa, FL Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Knoxville, TN The island of Bantayan counts children in its team of volunteers. The Diocese of Davao supports a continuing relief and economic redevelopment project in Bantayan. Photo: Gideon Bustamante[Episcopal News Service] Just over a week after the bishop of the newest diocese in the Philippines was consecrated on Nov. 23, 2012, Super Typhoon Bopha hit, killing more than 1,000 people and destroying homes and land. Almost 12 months later, in November 2013, came Super Typhoon Haiyan, killing as many as 10,000 people, making it one of the deadliest storms in the Philippines to date. As the Rt. Rev. Jonathan L. Casimina, bishop, put it, “We began our diocese with a typhoon, and we ended our first year with a typhoon.”Following destruction caused by Typhoon Bopha in 2012, representatives from the Diocese of Davao provided relief to residents of a small mountain village. Those residents asked the diocese for spiritual support, as well, and Chapel of the Transfiguration, pictured here, was born. Photo: Emily CherryIn between those environmentally catastrophic bookends came plenty of struggles for the Diocese of Davao in the Episcopal Church of the Philippines, which today is a year and a half old. While facing the usual start-up challenges of staffing, finances and vision-building, the diocese also had to look outward to its community, and quickly determine what role disaster response would play in its ministry. But it’s those struggles that have helped formed the new diocese, according to the bishop. “Even in crisis, there’s always an opportunity for mission,” said Casimina. “And that’s where our church is actually being defined.”In March 2014, staff from the Episcopal Diocese of Virginia visited the Episcopal Church in the Philippines, where Young Adult Service Corps volunteer Ashley Cameron of Virginia is stationed. “Our goal in making this trip to the Philippines was not only to visit with our YASCer Ashley Cameron, but also to learn how the Episcopal Church in the Philippines approaches its ministries,” said Buck Blanchard, the Diocese of Virginia’s director for mission and outreach. “The staff at the Episcopal Church Center had expressed interest in having more dioceses reach out and get to know the Episcopal Church in the Philippines,” he added. “It’s important for us to make those personal connections with our brothers and sisters in the Anglican Communion to see what unites us.”The Episcopal Diocese of Davao is located on the island of Mindanao, in the southern Philippines. When Haiyan – or Yolanda, as it is known locally – hit, it targeted victims a bit further north. As a group that had previous experience responding to natural disaster with Typhoon Bopha, the Diocese of Davao started to mobilize. Within one week, the diocesan youth and the Episcopal Church Women group had hosted a “Dinner for a Cause” to raise funds to support the typhoon victims. High-school students had gone door-to-door to collect more than $2,000 to donate to diocesan relief efforts.And on the day Typhoon Haiyan struck, the Diocese of Davao released a Letter of Appeal: “As people of faith we are yet again reminded of the powerful symbols of wind and water being both as destructive, as in the case of storms such as this super typhoon, as well as nurturing and life giving, especially in relation to scriptural and sacramental reflection of our liturgical life. Let us not be overwhelmed nor disheartened by all this tragic destruction we see and hear on the news.”The diocese identified in the tragedy an opportunity for ministry – an opportunity to claim an identity in the face of disaster. Casimina looked at the situation like this: “If we make ministry our priority, God will definitely provide for our needs.” So three weeks after the storm, the diocese organized a team of 30 people – including almost all of the diocesan staff members, some local clergy and a team of medical volunteers from the Diocese of Sebah in Malaysia – to take a disaster response trip to Bantayan Island.Coconut trees on the island of Bantayan will take a few more years to recover from the damage caused by Typhoon Haiyan. The Diocese of Davao supports a continuing relief and economic redevelopment project in Bantayan. Photo: Gideon BustamanteSituated in the Visayan Sea, Bantayan is a small island where almost all of the homes were destroyed. Most of the area was completely flooded, groves of coconut trees destroyed and farms leveled. “People were holding onto anything just to survive,” said Casimina. But media and relief efforts seemed to focus primarily on the area surrounding the city of Tacloban on Leyte Island, where the devastation was severe. So the Diocese of Davao decided to focus its efforts on Bantayan instead. The group distributed relief packs full of food, soap and supplies. The medical team performed minor operations, and provided medicine and supplies.The Episcopal Church in the Philippines does not have any congregations on Bantayan, where the population is mostly Roman Catholic. But, as Casimina explained, “It feels good to help your neighbor… but it feels better to help a stranger … It is incumbent on our part to really help, regardless of what their religion is. That is one of the strengths of the Episcopal Diocese of Davao.”Staff of the Diocese of Davao, pictured here with Ashley Cameron of the Young Adult Service Corps and Emily Cherry and Buck Blanchard of the Diocese of Virginia, joined together in a disaster relief project following Typhoon Haiyan. Photo: Emily CherryDuring their visit, the Virginia team toured several dioceses in the north to learn about their ministries and development projects, in addition to a trip to the Diocese of Davao in the south. “We specifically went to Davao because it is a brand new diocese that is looking for international friends,” said Blanchard. “We want to make sure that we are open and receptive to those sorts of opportunities to connect with people who are so eager to share their story.”The Virginia team spent time with national and diocesan staff, learning about rebuilding and rehabilitation efforts. “The Episcopal Church of the Philippines’ approach to typhoon relief is community-based – and by no means limited to Episcopal communities,” said Blanchard. The Diocese of Santiago, for example, is home to a center that produces food to be shipped to the typhoon victims. And in the Diocese of Davao, Blanchard added, “I was impressed at their willingness to be fearless and to simply go where they felt called, without a lot of hand-wringing – and that’s something we can learn from.”Now, five months after Haiyan struck, the Diocese of Davao continues its efforts on Bantayan island, moving from the development and relief phase of rebuilding structures to the economic rehabilitation phase. “Maybe we cannot provide all their needs, but at least we can do something to help their livelihoods,” said Gideon Bustamante, program coordinator in the Social Ministry Unit for the Diocese of Davao.On a recent trip back to Bantayan, Bustamante reported that, while many homes had been repaired, as much as 40 percent of the population was living in shelter boxes and tents in some cities. As a large fishing community, many residents’ incomes are suffering as a result of destroyed boats and nets, and the diocese has plans to help rebuild and refurbish those. They continue to distribute food and relief supplies, as well. Bustamante is coordinating with the national church office to discuss future plans for economic rehabilitation. And the group from Malaysia is making plans to return, along with a youth group from Japan.Members of St. Mary’s Chapel in the Diocese of Davao. Photo: Emily CherryTyphoons are a constant for the 7,000+ islands that make up the Philippines, and likewise, typhoon response is a top priority for the Episcopal Church of the Philippines, which became an official missionary district of the Episcopal Church in 1901 and later was a diocese of the Episcopal Church. In 1990, it became an independent province of the Anglican Communion, and continues today in a covenant relationship with the Episcopal Church. Following Haiyan, the Episcopal Church issued a statement about its approach to disaster relief: “If there is any bright spot to the catastrophic landscape brought about by the destructive typhoons, it is the immediate response of the Filipino people, even those directly affected, wanting to help fellow Filipinos.”The church’s response focuses on sustainability and community loan programs – and it’s a churchwide effort. Throughout the process, they’ve found, “Disasters usually bring out the best in communities,” said Floyd Lalwet, provincial secretary for the Episcopal Church in the Philippines. “Our people have become more open to giving to others,” said Lalwet. “There’s an openness to share not only money, but [products] of our own communities.”A long-standing partner of the U.S.-based Episcopal Church, the Church in the Philippines also has found support from the global community in its typhoon relief efforts, including from Episcopal Relief & Development. In the aftermath of Haiyan, the relief organization spearheaded fundraising efforts, in addition to providing rebuilding support. Sean McConnell and Sara Delaney of Episcopal Relief & Development recently returned from a trip to the Philippines. “When it comes to typhoon relief, the Episcopal Church in the Philippines exemplifies the best in asset-based methodology,” McConnell said. Individual communities analyze their resources and then determine how best they can use those assets to benefit others while sustaining themselves.Following destruction caused by Typhoon Bopha in 2012, representatives from the Diocese of Davao provided relief to residents of a small mountain village. Those residents asked the diocese for spiritual support, as well, and Chapel of the Transfiguration, was born. Here, members of Transfiguration welcome visitors. Photo: Emily CherryThe Diocese of Davao, through its ministry to typhoon victims, is an example of a church that has grown in its openness to giving. The diocese is proud of its Episcopal identity, and dedicated to nurturing it. “The Episcopal Church is too good not to be shared with others,” said Casimina. That maxim held true in the mountains surrounding Davao city. Following the December 2012 Typhoon Bopha, known locally as Pablo, diocesan representatives traveled to outlying areas to offer relief and rebuilding services. In one area, after receiving aid from the Diocese of Davao, the local residents wanted to join and worship in the Episcopal Church. “They asked us not only to sustain their material needs, but to sustain their spiritual needs, as well,” said Casimina. And so the Chapel of the Transfiguration was created in the Diocese of Davao. By reaching out to help a community, the diocese actually grew and strengthened their church.That mentality and outward-reaching focus has served the Diocese of Davao well in its inaugural year. They’ve created an ambitious agenda which features HIV/AIDs awareness, evangelism and communications, and environmental advocacy. Most recently, the diocese was awarded a United Thank Offering grant for the construction of a cathedral that also will host a sanctuary center for female and child victims of abuse.It’s this commitment to community that has made their typhoon relief efforts all the more powerful. The Diocese of Davao’s letter of appeal following Typhoon Haiyan continues: “Let not the howling winds nor crashing waves deter us from listening to the still, small voice of God whispering in our hearts to remember and lift up all the typhoon victims in our prayers and, in the compassionate spirit of Christ, to become his hands in reaching out and bringing comfort and consolation to their suffering and grieving hearts in anyway and manner we can in extending our help to them whether in cash or in kind assisting them towards eventual healing and rebuilding of their shattered lives in further strengthening their fervent hope for a new and better life.”Today, in the Diocese of Davao and the greater Episcopal Church in the Philippines, that commitment to heal, rebuild and strengthen continues.Learn about Episcopal Relief & Development’s response to Typhoon Haiyan here.— Emily Cherry is the communications director for the Episcopal Diocese of Virginia. An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Episcopal Relief & Development Rector Bath, NC Submit a Job Listing Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit an Event Listing Rector Washington, DC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Anglican Communion, Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Youth Minister Lorton, VA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Tags Rector Belleville, IL Rector Shreveport, LA Submit a Press Release Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS By Emily CherryPosted Apr 8, 2014 Featured Events Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Featured Jobs & Calls Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Hopkinsville, KY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Rector Columbus, GA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 last_img read more

New video with rare footage asks if Jonah Lomu could have made it in the NFL

first_imgThursday Jun 25, 2020 New video with rare footage asks if Jonah Lomu could have made it in the NFL Just a few days back footage of young Jonah Lomu tearing it up at schoolboy level emerged, giving us a feeling for how devastating he was from an early age. Now, this latest Rugbypass video asks how he would have done if he had given the NFL a go. ADVERTISEMENTLomu was the sport of rugby’s first global superstar. With that came all sorts of attention, including from NFL scouts, who reportedly made offers to the All Black legend in his prime.Over the weekend a NFL star actually made an outrageous claim, clearly trolling rugby fans, that he could dominate rugby if he gave it a go. That soon got shot down, but how would it look in reverse?There have been a number of rugby players who have given it a go in the NFL. Jared Hayne was one of them, and then recently Christian Wade has had some success in building his name with the Buffalo Bills.But how would Jonah have done? At 6ft5, 118kg and with lethal speed, balance and power, there’s no doubt that he would have had the athletic ability to give it a full go.Whether he became a star or not is another question, but either way, we can be grateful that he didn’t chase the money and instead stuck with rugby, as the sport was all the richer for it.ADVERTISEMENT Posted By: rugbydump Share Send Thanks Sorry there has been an error See it to Believe it Related Articles 25 WEEKS AGO WATCH: Experts explain what actually happens… 26 WEEKS AGO WATCH: Leigh Halfpenny makes yet another… 26 WEEKS AGO Parisse alley-oop magic sets up brilliant… From the WebThis Video Will Soon Be Banned. Watch Before It’s DeletedSecrets RevealedYou Won’t Believe What the World’s Most Beautiful Girl Looks Like TodayNueeyUrologists Stunned: Forget the Blue Pill, This “Fixes” Your EDSmart Life ReportsGranny Stuns Doctors by Removing Her Wrinkles with This Inexpensive TipSmart Life ReportsIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier Living10 Types of Women You Should Never MarryNueeyThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancellast_img read more

Rio Blanco Pavilion / Estudio Carme Pinós

first_img “COPY” Manufacturers: AYUSO, TerniumCollaborators:Juan-Antonio Andreu, Elsa Marti, Holger HennefarthSite Collaborator:Diego QuirarteRedacción Proyecto:2011-2012Año Construcción :2012-2013Project Architect:Carme Pinós DesplatCity:GuadalajaraCountry:MexicoMore SpecsLess SpecsSave this picture!© Jordi BernadóRecommended ProductsFiber Cements / CementsRieder GroupFacade Panels – concrete skinMetallicsStudcoWall Stop Ends – EzyCapMetallicsKriskadecorMetal Fabric – Outdoor CladdingFiber Cements / CementsULMA Architectural SolutionsPaper Facade Panel in Leioa School RestorationText description provided by the architects. The project consists of a small resting pavilion facing a spectacular view of the Barranco del Rio Dulce, in the Mexican city of Guadalajara, next to a horse riding practice arena.We wanted the pavilion to open to the views and the environment, but at the same time, to give an image of solidity appropriate to the stone walls found in the site.Save this picture!Planta Baja+ 21The building is resolved with three modules containing the program requiring more privacy: the bathroom, a small room for siesta and kitchen (although this is open to the dining room). These modules are offset by rotating about the topography, with the fireplace as the access of rotation. This movement results in more open spaces such as the dining room, living room and study.Save this picture!© Jordi BernadóThe structure is made of wooden beams that follow the direction of the maximum length, which seems illogical at first but turns the roof into a coffer that explains the rotation of the modules well and provides a feeling of spaciousness. While from the outside the pavilion is perceived opaque and small, from inside the effect is the opposite, with a perception of amplitude and transparency.Save this picture!ModelThis project has sought an effect of timelessness and comfort. The good understanding with the client led us to design down to the last detail, including all furniture except the chairs and lamps.Save this picture!© Jordi BernadóSave this picture!© Jordi BernadóProject gallerySee allShow lessKumbh Mela: Designing the World’s Largest Gathering Of PeoplePublications7 Takeaways from Van Alen’s Survey on Architectural CompetitionsArchitecture News Share Houses 2013 Save this picture!© Jordi Bernadó+ 21 Share ArchDaily Year:  ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/624083/rio-blanco-pavilion-estudio-carme-pinos Clipboard “COPY” Architects: Estudio Carme Pinós Year Completion year of this architecture project center_img Mexico Rio Blanco Pavilion / Estudio Carme PinósSave this projectSaveRio Blanco Pavilion / Estudio Carme Pinós Projects Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project Rio Blanco Pavilion / Estudio Carme Pinós ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/624083/rio-blanco-pavilion-estudio-carme-pinos Clipboard CopyHouses•Guadalajara, Mexico CopyAbout this officeEstudio Carme PinósOfficeFollowProductsWoodSteelStone#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesGuadalajaraWoodMexicoPublished on April 28, 2015Cite: “Rio Blanco Pavilion / Estudio Carme Pinós” [Pabellón Rio Blanco / Estudio Carme Pinós] 28 Apr 2015. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Read commentsBrowse the CatalogSinkshansgroheBathroom Mixers – FocusGlass3MInterior Finishes at U.S. Bank StadiumPartitionsSkyfoldMarkerboard Finish for Folding WallsFiber Cements / CementsSwisspearlFiber Cement Cladding Panels in B66 Business CenterMembranesEffisusFaçade Protection – Breather+Metal PanelsSculptformClick-on Battens in WestConnex M8 JunctionPanels / Prefabricated AssembliesBruagBack-Ventilated Facades – CELLONTiles / Mosaic / GresiteMargresPorcelain Tiles – Linea CosmosGlassDip-TechCeramic Printing for Public TransportationAcousticSchöckStaircase Insulation – Tronsole®Porcelain StonewareApavisaSlabs – Wild ForestBulbs / SpotsAmbiance LumiereLighting – ZetaMore products »Read commentsSave世界上最受欢迎的建筑网站现已推出你的母语版本!想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my streamlast_img read more

Globalrichlist.com raises funds for CARE

first_img About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Globalrichlist.com sounds like a prospect researcher’s dream come true. Instead it’s a viral campaign to raise awareness and funds for development agency CARE International.The campaign was created by London-based creative agency Poke. They say they built the site “because we wanted to challenge people’s perception of their personal wealth. And while we’re at it hopefully raise some money for a good cause.” In fact, the link with CARE came after the initial idea.The idea is to make people feel rich and then to persuade them to give some of that money to charity. The approach is both well researched and humorous. You are asked to enter your annual salary (whether in dollars or pounds), and you are then given a ranking comparing your income to that of everyone on the planet. Not surprisingly, a comfortable income in the UK rockets one into the richest one per cent on earth. Advertisement Howard Lake | 24 September 2003 | News AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Globalrichlist.com raises funds for CARE We were greeted with the response: “You are in the top 0.892% richest people in the world. There are 5,946,473,235 people poorer than you.” The site then calculates one hour of your salary and suggests you donate it online to CARE International, which uses Justgiving.com’s online donation facility.center_img Even better, the site offers you a customised graphic button to add to your Web site to promote the Globalrichlist.com to others. You can choose from three personalised boxes and three generic buttons.In its first month, the site has raised £3,032.82. Not a huge sum, but remember that this initiative simply required CARE’s approval: it was conceived and implemented by the agency.  50 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis I’m the 53,526,765 richest person on earth!Discover how rich you are! >> Tagged with: Consulting & Agencies Digital Giving/Philanthropylast_img read more

Boards That Work: A Guide for Charity Trustees

first_imgBoards That Work: A Guide for Charity Trustees  9 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Howard Lake | 22 November 2007 | Newslast_img read more

The Swedish Per Anger Prize awarded to young female journalist in Afghanistan

first_img to go further Najwa Alimi was nominated for the Per Anger Prize by RSF Sweden, the Swedish section of Reporters Without Borders. In 2017 Reporters Without Borders opened the first center for protection of women journalists in Afghanistan, Committee for the Protection of Afghan Women Journalists (CPAWJ) who gives support to women media workers in Afghanistan. – This prize comes at the right time. In the ongoing peace negotiations the importance of the protection of journalists and women´s rights can´t be underestimated as the key for a sustainable and long lasting result that will benefit all of Afghanistan. There is a need for more journalists like Najwa Alimi putting a spotlight on the often brutal and extreme violations of press freedom and women´s rights, says Erik Halkjaer, President of RSF Sweden. Najwa Alimi will be presented with the Per Anger Prize on 17 October at a ceremony held at the grand theatre Göta Lejon in Stockholm. The prize will be presented by the Swedish Minister of Culture and Democracy, Amanda Lind. The prize winner will be available for interviews in Stockholm on 14–16 October.The Per Anger Prize is the Swedish government’s international prize for human rights and democracy. The prize was established in 2004 to draw attention to diplomat Per Anger’s great work during the Second World War. The Living History Forum has been commissioned by the government to award the prize each year.Nine international organisations participated in the nomination work for the Per Anger Prize: Afrikagrupperna, Amnesty International, Civil Rights Defenders, Diakonia, ICJ Sweden (Swedish Section of the International Commission of Jurists), Kvinna till kvinna, RSF Sweden (Swedish section of Reporters without Borders), the Church of Sweden, and Swedish PEN. For more information, please contact: Living History Forum’s press officer at: +46 70-259 38 19 or press(a)levandehistoria.se.Anna Widmark, RSF Sweden director, at: +46 72-308 05 23 or reportrarutangranser(a)rsf.org More information about the Per Anger Prize can be found at www.livinghistory.se and about the work of RSF in Afghanistan at www.rsf.org/en/afghanistan  I want to demonstrate that women can work in an industry considered taboo for them. I realised that journalism was the quickest way if I wanted to reach women all around Afghanistan, and that it could serve as a platform to fight for women’s rights, says Najwa Alimi.Afghanistan is one of the world’s most dangerous countries for journalists, but also for women in general. Najwa Alimi is 25 years old, and she currently works as a reporter for the Afghan TV channel Zan TV, the only channel in the country that employs only female reporters and editors. She has made a name for herself as a fearless reporter, raising topics preferably avoided by other journalists, including social vulnerability, homelessness, drug addiction, and women’s rights.– As a journalist, Najwa Alimi has been shot at and threatened. To keep fighting for women’s rights to be seen and heard takes great courage. Najwa Alimi gives hope to a new generation of Afghan girls and boys, says Ingrid Lomfors, Director of the Living History Forum and chairman of the Per Anger Prize jury.The conditions for women in Afghanistan are slowly improving. But progress is slow, and many women are subjected to both violence and discrimination. More and more women enter the workforce, but harassment and the lack of education still present major obstacles for many of them. Last year, 14 journalists were killed, more than in any other country in the world, and so far this year four journalists have been killed. As female journalists grow in numbers, taking up more space, the threat against them increases. – Receiving the Per Anger Prize makes me even more convinced that I’m on the right track, that I should keep doing what I’m doing, and work even harder, says Najwa Alimi. Organisation SwedenAfghanistanEurope – Central AsiaAsia – Pacific Events News Help by sharing this information RSF_en Respect judicial independence in cases of two leading journalists in Serbia and Montenegro, RSF says News SwedenAfghanistanEurope – Central AsiaAsia – Pacific Events Newscenter_img June 7, 2021 Find out more Follow the news on Europe – Central Asia RSF calls for a fully transparent investigation after mine kills two journalists in Azerbaijan June 8, 2021 Find out more News With her life at stake, journalist Najwa Alimi challenges Afghanistan’s traditional view of women and men. In a country where women are seldom allowed to leave their homes unaccompanied, she can be seen on television as a reporter on the Afghan TV channel Zan TV. Nominated by the Swedish section of Reporters Without Borders, Najwa Alimi is awarded the Per Anger Prize for her fight for freedom of expression and women’s rights. The Per Anger Prize is the Swedish government’s international prize for human rights and democracy, awarded by the Living History Forum. September 16, 2019 – Updated on September 17, 2019 The Swedish Per Anger Prize awarded to young female journalist in Afghanistan “We’ll hold Ilham Aliyev personally responsible if anything happens to this blogger in France” RSF says Receive email alerts June 4, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

Freedom of Expression awards go to Ciudad Juárez and Novaya Gazeta blogs

first_img to go further Organisation MexicoAmericas Help by sharing this information Follow the news on Mexico Ciudad Juárez, en la sombra del narcotráfico, a courageous blog about drug cartel activities, government repression and police corruption in northern Mexico, is the jury choice in the “Reporters Without Borders Press Freedom” category of this year’s BOBs (Best of Blogs competition), organized by the German radio station Deutsche Welle. The blog’s author, Spanish journalist Judith Torrea, was chosen from 11 finalists by an international jury consisting of bloggers and a Reporters Without Borders representative. Using her own name, despite all the threats and dangers in Mexico, Torrea does investigative reporting in and around Ciudad Juárez, where she has lived since 2009, interviewing victims and the relatives of people who have disappeared or been murdered.With at least 71 journalists killed since 2000 and 13 others disappeared since 2003, Mexico is one of the world’s most dangerous countries for media personnel. Many flee abroad to escape reprisals by drug traffickers or corrupt elements within the police or army. The threats to the media from mafias and cartels were documented in “Organized crime: muscling in on the media,” a report published in February by Reporters Without Borders.Voting on the BOBs website from 22 March to 11 April, the public also chose its own winner in each of the competition’s categories. The public’s choice in the “Reporters Without Borders” category is the blog kept by the editorial staff of the Moscow-based independent newspaper Novaya Gazeta. Providing outspoken coverage of such stories as the Caucasus and police abuses, Novaya Gazeta has become an institution in Russia and abroad.As a result of its success, the newspaper is often attacked and five of its journalists, including Anna Politkovskaya and Anastasia Baburova, have been murdered since 2001. The blog is also often the target of cyber-attacks that make it inaccessible. The newspaper has its own website that is distinct from the blog.Prizes were awarded for blogs in 11 languages (Arabic, Bengali, Chinese, English, Farsi, French, German, Indonesian, Russian, Spanish and Portuguese) and in six different categories. As well as “Reporters Without Borders,” the categories included Best Blog, Best Video Channel, Best Use of Technology for Social Good, Special Topic Award Human Rights and (this year for the first time) Best Social Activism Campaign. The winners can be seen at http://www.thebobs.com.Last year, the jury choice in the “Reporters Without Borders” category was We are journalists, the blog of Iranian journalist and human rights activist Jila Bani Yaghoob, while the public’s choice was Green Dream, the blog of Saudi journalist and human rights activist Trad Al-Asmari. This year’s prizes will be presented at Deutsche Welle’s Global Media Forum in Bonn on 20 June. Reporter murdered in northwestern Mexico’s Sonora state NSO Group hasn’t kept its promises on human rights, RSF and other NGOs say MexicoAmericas 2011-2020: A study of journalist murders in Latin America confirms the importance of strengthening protection policies Newscenter_img RSF_en April 12, 2011 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Freedom of Expression awards go to Ciudad Juárez and Novaya Gazeta blogs May 13, 2021 Find out more News Reports May 5, 2021 Find out more News Receive email alerts April 28, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

40 new jobs to be created at Largo foods in Gweedore

first_img Main Evening News, Sport and Obituaries Tuesday May 25th 75 positive cases of Covid confirmed in North WhatsApp 40 new jobs to be created at Largo foods in Gweedore Facebook News Pinterest By News Highland – June 22, 2010 40 new jobs are to be created at Largo Food Exports Ltd in Gweedore.The company currently employs some 184 people on the Gweedore Business Park.The Largo Group companies produce snack-foods at their bases in Ashbourne and in Gweedore and have provided steady employment in the Donegal Gaeltacht for many years.The company plans to develop a new snack product at the site.Northwest MEP, Pat the Cope Gallagher has welcomed the annoucment.[podcast]http://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/06/pat530.mp3[/podcast] Further drop in people receiving PUP in Donegal WhatsApp Google+center_img Google+ RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Previous articleSt Aengus’ school hailed as a model of sustainable energyNext articleDerry gorse fire started deliberatley News Highland Pinterest Man arrested on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences in Derry 365 additional cases of Covid-19 in Republic Gardai continue to investigate Kilmacrennan fire Twitter Twitter Facebooklast_img read more