Halo could be most effective method yet devised to reduce F1’s appeal

first_imgAs grand prix drivers go, Tony Brooks was one of the best produced by Britain. He was also among the bravest of the brave, at a time when the sport was at its most dangerous and he could expect to lose friends and rivals almost every week.When his BRM overturned and burst into flames after hitting a bank at full speed at Silverstone in 1956, he was fortunate to be thrown out of the cockpit and escape with nothing worse than a broken jaw. A year later he was lying trapped under his Aston Martin at Le Mans when a glancing blow from a passing Porsche allowed him to wriggle free, at the cost of severe cuts and bruises. Undeterred, he went on to win world championship grands prix at the world’s fastest road circuits – Spa, Monza and Reims – against drivers such as Juan Manuel Fangio and Stirling Moss. Formula One Reuse this content Ten years ago, long before anyone had even dreamed of the halo, I asked him about the differences between racing in his era, when the trackside hazards included ditches, trees and telegraph poles, and today. His reply was succinct and striking.“It’s just not the same challenge,” he said. “I’m not against the idea of safety. But in becoming so safe, it’s become a totally different sport. It’s like comparing a tightrope walker in a circus with a safety net with a tightrope walker crossing a ravine, above a great big drop.”Today’s downhill skiers and motorbike racers have airbags inside their suits. Batsmen have helmets and padding. And now, as those on Sunday who tune in to the season-opening Australian Grand Prix will discover, Formula One drivers have a halo to protect their heads. Some fans have shuddered at the sight of what looks like a bit of carbon fibre and titanium scaffolding plonked on top of the cockpit of each car. Others have shrugged. The drivers have been similarly divided, although most of them have been making noises of diplomatic acquiescence to the new reality.Max Verstappen and Nico Hülkenberg are unafraid to say they hate it. Lewis Hamilton doesn’t like the way it looks but claims that by halfway through the season we’ll be so used to it that last year’s cars will look old-fashioned. Maybe he’s right. But the halo asks some bigger questions than that. Questions about danger, about acceptable risk, about the motives for participating in a sport and for watching it.For whom do tightrope walkers and racing drivers perform? Is it for themselves, as a way of testing their courage and skill while receiving a massive adrenaline rush, or for the audience, whose admiration rises in proportion to the degree of risk? And at what point do the participants and the spectators need to be protected from the possible consequences? Facebook Fernando Alonso in the 2018 McLaren. Photograph: Tim Goode/PA Pinterest Read more Share on LinkedIn Topics Max Verstappen: ‘I’ve never doubted myself. I just drive as fast as I can’ Share on Twitter Since you’re here… Formula One 2018 Support The Guardian Twitter Anything that consistently limits a driver’s field of vision and potentially impedes his exit after a crash is surely a bad idea, even when its intention is to guard against an accident such as the one in which a detached wheel took the life of Henry Surtees in a Formula Two race at Brands Hatch almost a decade ago. But most fatal accidents are freakish, to some degree; a halo would not have prevented the head injury that took Jules Bianchi’s life after an accident at Suzuka in 2014, for example.Some sports were devised to be dangerous. Limiting the danger to suit changing attitudes and modern sensibilities is fine as long as the measures taken do not devalue a sport so profoundly that its meaning disappears. At a time when F1 is struggling to hold on to a dwindling audience, the halo could be the most effective method yet devised to reduce its appeal. If racing drivers aren’t doing something dangerous, then what’s the point of them? Share on Facebook Share on Pinterest Read more FIA’s Jean Todt defends Halo F1 system from ‘childish’ Toto Wolff criticism After Lorenzo Bandini suffered fatal burns at Monaco in 1967, straw bales were no longer used as safety barriers in F1. When Ayrton Senna’s helmet was pierced by a snapped suspension arm at Imola in 1994, the mandatory height of cockpit sides was raised. Like the introduction of safety belts and flameproof overalls in the 1960s, these were sensible precautions that did not change the nature of the sport. The halo, however, is different.In the view of Fernando Alonso, the fact that it is a safety device means “there should not be any debate” over what is probably the most controversial single technical change ever made to the sport. Jean Todt, the president of the world governing body, the FIA, sanctioned its introduction, perhaps fearful of lawsuits that might have followed fatal accidents in the future, had the device been rejected.The halo was accepted by F1 even as teams in the US equivalent, the IndyCar series, were testing a transparent wraparound aeroscreen that is potentially more effective at warding off stray flying objects – such as the spring from Rubens Barrichello’s car that fractured Felipe Massa’s skull in 2009 – and aesthetically far more pleasing.“Ugly” was how Kevin Magnussen described the halo during pre-season testing, before going on to express more ominous reservations. “It’s difficult to get into the car, difficult to get out of the car, difficult to get the steering wheel on and off, just awkward and annoying,” the Haas driver said. There was also the question of the central pillar obstructing the driver’s view. “It distracts your eye when you change direction like in a chicane and you have to move your vision across the pillar,” he said, adding that at places such as Spa’s Eau Rouge and Austin’s Turn One, which feature sharp elevation changes, the halo’s rim could block the sight of an incident ahead. Sportblog comment Share on Messenger … we have a small favour to ask. More people, like you, are reading and supporting the Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we made the choice to keep our reporting open for all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford to pay.The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We hope you will consider supporting us today. We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism that’s open and independent. Every reader contribution, however big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Share via Email Motor sport Share on WhatsApplast_img read more

10 months agoWest Ham boss Pellegrini tells 2-goal Anderson: I want more

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say West Ham boss Pellegrini tells 2-goal Anderson: I want moreby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveWest Ham boss Manuel Pellegrini was delighted with two-goal Felipe Anderson after victory at Southampton.Pellegrini has now challenged the 25-year-old to be even better than his current form, although the manager is delighted with how the club’s record signing is performing.“He’s a different player,” Pellegrini said. “He’s a player that makes important things in every game. “I continue to think that he will continue to improve. He’s still losing too many balls; maybe he needs to understand that it’s not easy in the Premier League. “But in every game, he makes a difference, with important play.” last_img read more

We Ranked College Football’s 15 Hardest Schedules For The 2016 Season

first_imgA general view of the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum.LOS ANGELES, CA – OCTOBER 16: General View of the game between the California Golden Bears and the USC Trojans at Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum on October 16, 2010 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images) There will be some surrender cobras this year.There will be some surrender cobras this year.The 2016 college football season may seem far off in the future, but in reality, it’s less than four months away. Coaches and players, of course, are already preparing for the 12 opponents on their schedules. The teams on the list you’re about to read are likely preparing a little harder than the rest, however.Every year, due to both conference affiliation and scheduling, some teams wind up having way more difficult schedules than their peers. It can be both a blessing and a curse. If you run through a tough schedule, you’ll likely be rewarded when bowl season comes around. If you struggle, you might not even qualify for the postseason.We’ve gone through and put together a list of what we think are the 15 hardest schedules in college football this upcoming season. No. 1 isn’t even debatable – you’ll see why.Get Started: The 15 Hardest Schedules For 2016 >>>Pages: Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8 Page 9 Page 10 Page 11 Page 12 Page 13 Page 14 Page 15 Page 16last_img read more

Eyewitnesses reporting crash on South Taylor Hill

first_imgORIGINAL POSTFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. — A number of eyewitnesses are reporting that Highway 97 is closed at the top of the South Taylor Hill because of a collision.The first report came in at 4:55 p.m. from Peace River South MLA Mike Bernier, who was driving on Highway 97 headed to the Fort St. John Airport. Bernier said that the crash, which involved a pickup truck and a semi-truck, had occurred just moments before he happened upon the scene. According to Bernier, the crash is located roughly 300 metres from the chain-up area at the top of the South Taylor Hill, and that emergency crews were just arriving on the scene when he arrived. He added that the crews at the scene have closed the highway in both directions.Several other motorists have also messaged Energeticcity.ca to report the crash, though at this point, there’s no word about the crash from DriveBC.ca or the RCMP. There were also no vehicles visible on the DriveBC highway cam at the top of the South Taylor Hill as of 5:06 p.m. MST. 12:30a.m. UPDATE – The Highway is open in both directions.11:00 p.m. UPDATE – Drivebc.ca still says the Highway will be closed until 3:30 a.m. Mountian time Monday.  For updates throughout the night visit www.drivebc.ca9:30 p.m. UPDATE – Drivebc.ca continues to say the Highway will be closed until at least 3:30 a.m. Mountain time Monday.  The next update on the status of the Highway will be issued at 11 p.m. 6:40 p.m. UPDATE – Drivebc.ca says the Highway will be closed until at least 3:30 a.m. Mountain time.  The only detour they recommend is using the highways through Chetwynd and Hudson’s Hope.6:00 p.m. UPDATE – Drivebc.ca says there is no current estimate on when the Highway will re-open.  They list the best detour as going back through Chetwynd and Hudson’s Hope.#BCHwy97 Closed 7km South of #TaylorBC due to vehicle incident. Detour available see: https://t.co/Ji95sHT9NK #YXJ #FortStJohn— Drive BC (@DriveBC) March 5, 20185:45 p.m. UPDATE – Eyewitnesses in the area of the collision say they are being told it will be several hours before the Highway will be open again.  Official information about the closure or the collision has not been released as of yet by authorities.Here is a photo of the scene.This image was sent to Energeticcity.ca.center_img This is a developing story, and we’ll have an update once we receive more information.last_img read more

Defensive backs Travis Howard Bradley Roby like to banter with Kerry Coombs

Ohio State cornerbacks Travis Howard and Bradley Roby aren’t shy about admitting their position coach, Kerry Coombs, is a bit of a trash talker. They said they’re the same way. “Me and Travis are already kind of like that,” said Roby, a rising redshirt sophomore. “He brings that same mentality, that hard-nose, trash-talking kind of play.” Roby said he likes it that way. “That’s how I am. I love that,” Roby said. “I’m right behind him doing the same thing.” Likewise, it seems Coombs’ fiery demeanor has also commanded Howard’s respect. But even more so, the rising redshirt senior said the guidance from the former Cincinnati assistant coach is what he and the rest of the corners need. “It’s definitely been a great change,” Howard said. “I mean, he’s a high intensity guy who’s willing to make sure we perfect our technique and make sure we work hard at whatever we do.” For Coombs, that feeling of admiration and respect is mutual. In addition to having what he called talented and gifted athletes, what has struck the 51-year-old the most is how diligently his players work. “They’re in my office poking their head in all the time,” he said. “They want to know what they can do to get better, they want to know where they fell short.” Coombs said it’s no secret that OSU has a “great history” of defensive secondary players. Outside the coaches’ offices, Coombs said there’s a wall commemorating eight first-round NFL Draft picks that the Buckeyes have produced throughout the years. Coombs said he thinks Roby will be the next to join the wall. “He’s big, and he’s fast, and he’s physical, and he’s intelligent and he’s got great change of direction,” Coombs said. “His transition is outstanding. And if Bradley’s not a first-round draft pick down the road, that would be a shame.” Roby, who recorded 47 tackles and three interceptions in 2011, said being one of the greatest corners to play at OSU has been his goal since arriving in Columbus. “I think about it everyday,” he said. “When I came up here, that was my goal. My goal hasn’t changed. I feel like I’m definitely on path for that.” And Coombs’ approach to the position, he said, will not only aid him in reaching that level, but will holistically benefit the team. Roby said compared to last season’s heavy emphasis on press coverage, Coombs has the cornerbacks playing further off the receivers than ever before. That, Roby said, allows he and the other corners the freedom and ability to be a “ball hawk” and create turnovers via interceptions. “I mean, that’s why I play football,” he said. “I just love to make plays.” Similarly, Howard said playing off is something he’s looking forward to. “I mean, I feel like we were a press team last year, we didn’t have enough opportunities to make plays on the ball so he came in with a new technique,” he said. “Now we’re getting a lot of chances making plays on the balls and getting good vision on the quarterback.” By playing off, Roby said he finds himself in a better position to make the play that every corner dreams of in Saturday’s Spring Game. “I’m trying to get at least one pick-six … it’s going to be there,” he said. “We’re going to have the pressure and they’re going to throw it up. I got to get a pick-six, I didn’t get one all last year, so I want a pick-six for sure.” read more

David Lingmerth wins 40th Memorial Tournament

Seung-Yul Noh watches after driving a ball during the 2015 Memorial Tournament on June 5 at Muirfield Village Golf Club in Dublin, Ohio. Credit: Samantha Hollingshead / Photo Editor Spectators were treated to an exciting weekend of golf at Muirfield Village Golf Club, where David Lingmerth secured his first win on the PGA TOUR, defeating Justin Rose in a three-hole sudden-death playoff at the 40th Memorial Tournament.Lingmerth finished fifth or better two of the first three days of the tournament and entered Sunday’s action 12-under par.  The win was his 68th tour event.  He was visibly excited.“I can’t believe it right now.  I’m so happy.  I don’t know where to go,” Lingmerth said.Rose entered the final day three shots back of the leader, Keegan Bradley, and held a three-stroke lead before bogeying the 14th and 16th holes, finishing the regulation portion of the round at par.“I pulled off shots when I really had too, coming down the stretch.  I would have liked to put myself in a position where I could have sailed coming down the stretch, but I really had to dig for it,” Rose said.A win for Rose would have been his eighth on tour and his second at Muirfield Village, where he won the Memorial Tournament in 2010, his first victory on the American tour.“It would have been lovely to win in the playoff, but there is a lot I could look back and think I could have done better,” Rose said.The Memorial, the annual invitation-only tournament founded by Upper Arlington native and Ohio State alumnus Jack Nicklaus, has featured some dramatics lately, as two of the last three finishes have been decided by a playoff, and four of the last five by two strokes or fewer.Originally from Sweden, Lingmerth has had success on the European Tour, but he is still cutting his teeth on the American circuit, and he was eager to play at Muirfield Village.“I had never played here, I wanted to come experience it,” Lingmerth said.Lingmerth, who had been heavily recruited to return to Europe for part of the summer, expressed his desire to stay in the United States to seek his first victory, honeyed by the fact that it came at the Memorial.“This tournament, hosted by Mr. Nicklaus, I can’t think of many things that compare to it,” Lingmerth said.In choosing to play the Memorial, Lingmerth skipped the Nordea Masters in his native Sweden.Tiger Woods, a five-time winner at Muirfield, finished two-over, good for 71st on the leaderboard.  He rebounded somewhat on Sunday, carding a two-over after an abhorrent Saturday, when he had a career worst single-day score of 85.Woods had previously announced he will not play again until the U.S. Open at Chambers Bay on June 18.  He attended the Memorial out of respect for his friendship with Nicklaus, whom he is still seeking to dethrone as the all-time major tournament wins leader.The Memorial, Nicklaus’ pride and joy, samples elements of some of golf’s great tournaments.  The invitation process is similar to that of the Masters at Augusta National, and Muirfield Village is named after a course in Scotland where Nicklaus won his first Open Championship in 1966. read more

House of Assembly halted due to busted audio system

first_img Opposition Leader responds to Throne Speech  11 days later; says PDM Govt plan puts TCI in ‘deep doo doo’ Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Olive branch extended by Opposition Leader, says it is time for Turks and Caicos leaders to unite TCI Country Leaders condemn vicious memes Related Items:appropriations committee, audio system, house of assembly, john phillipis, pnp Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, 20 Nov 2015 – The House of Assembly was held up in doing the business of the country today when the microphone system went out; it forced an almost two hour closure of Parliament on Thursday. It was earlier this week that some members of the Appropriations Committee chided the PNP Administration for cutting back on monies allocated for improvements to the House of Assembly. The Member for Five Cays told Magnetic Media, the House of Assembly is ‘falling apart.’ Governor’s Appointed Member, Hon John Philips also had thoughts about the state of the honourable House of Assembly. Recommended for youlast_img read more

SWAT team called after reports of gunfire in Bonita suspect arrested

first_img October 28, 2018 SWAT team called after reports of gunfire in Bonita, suspect arrested KUSI Newsroom KUSI Newsroom, BONITA (KUSI) — Reports of gunfire in a neighborhood in Bonita brought out a SWAT team, where an alleged gunman was arrested and nine other people were detained Sunday.No one was hurt, and sheriff’s deputies ultimately arrested one person in connection with the incident.A caller told police just before 4 a.m. Sunday that they could hear gunshots in a neighborhood east of Briarwood Road and south of state Route 54, San Diego County Sheriff’s Department Lt. Michael McNeill said.A Sheriff’s Department SWAT team headed to the 5400 block of Robinwood Road, where they found shell casings and live rounds in the driveway of a house and initially detained nine people for questioning. Officers from the San Diego and Chula Vista police departments also responded to help.While deputies and officers were conducting their investigation, they heard several more gunshots coming from nearby, McNeill said.Deputies and officers saw a man run away, and they briefly chased him but lost sight of him, according to a Sheriff’s Department news release. With the help of a police dog, they were able to find the man hiding in shrubs outside an apartment complex, and they detained him as well.Deputies also found a gun and a magazine in the area, McNeill said.The man, Salvador Barajas, 25, was first taken to a hospital for a medical evaluation before being booked into jail on suspicion of negligent discharge of a firearm. Posted: October 28, 2018 Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitterlast_img read more