Journalist killed in troubling circumstances

first_img In blow to impunity, panel says investigation into blogger’s death should resume February 4, 2021 Find out more MalawiAfrica Organisation Social networks and TV signals down after close of polls in Malawi Reporters Without Borders today expressed its concern about the death of freelance journalist Don Kulapani on 8 August during the hold-up of a bar in the capital, and called on the authorities to conduct a full investigation into this killing, which has coincided with attacks on journalists by the ruling party.”We ask you to fully clarify the circumstances of the journalist’s death and to establish that it was not linked to the exercise of his profession”, Reporters Without Borders secretary-general Robert Ménard said in a letter to Interior Minister Monjeza Maluza. “The fact that it coincides with recent attacks on journalists by the UDF’s youth league is troubling, to say the least”, Ménard said in the letter, which requested that Reporters Without Borders be kept informed about the investigation’s progress.A freelancer who used to work for The Chronicle newspaper, Kulapani was in a bar in the capital, Lilongwe, on 8 August when four armed men entered and opened fire, hitting the journalist. They then stabbed him many times. The assailants took cases of beer, musical equipment and cash from the till before making off. Kulapani died as a result of these injuries.The journalist’s death comes soon after the release of a statement by theruling UDF denying news media claims that it had a unit tasked with silencing investigative journalists who “embarrass” the government. In early August, the National Media Institute of South Africa claimed to have discovered a UDF plot to attack journalists of the Daily Times, Weekly Chronicle, Pride and BBC for having accused the UDF of intending to change the constitution to allow President Bakili Muluzi to run for a third term in 2004.Young activists have been implicated in beatings of journalists who support the opposition party, especially journalists working for the Chronicle, Kulapani’s former employer. The Daily Times had already alleged in November 2001 that the UDF had complied a list of journalists who “discredit the party” and that it intended to use its youth wing to attack them. Help by sharing this information News News Receive email alerts to go furthercenter_img August 12, 2002 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Journalist killed in troubling circumstances News Twitter arbitrarily blocks South African newsweekly and several reporters over Covid vaccine story October 10, 2012 Find out more News May 24, 2019 Find out more RSF_en MalawiAfrica Follow the news on Malawilast_img read more

Limerick appeal to save ‘gay bull’ Benjy

first_imgWalk in Covid testing available in Limerick from Saturday 10th April RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Email Linkedin Surgeries and clinic cancellations extended Twitter WhatsApp Advertisement Facebook No vaccines in Limerick yet center_img Previous articleLimerick pensioners remanded on terrorism chargesNext articleInsider information Alan Jacqueshttp://www.limerickpost.ie by Alan Jacques | [email protected] rights activist John Carmody is calling on Limerick people to help save the life of a ‘gay bull’ that is destined for slaughter because he has shown no interest in cows and has a sexual preference for other bulls.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Animal Rights Action Network (ARAN), founded by Mr Carmody, last week responded to plans to destroy Benjy, a pedigree Charolais bull, purchased for purposes of breeding by a farmer in County Mayo.ARAN has teamed up with one of the UK’s biggest online gay magazines THEGAYUK, and the Hillside Animal Sanctuary in Norwich, to save Benjy.The group has secured a deal with the owner of the bull so the animal can live out his life in peace. THEGAYUK have also launched an online campaign to raise funds to purchase the bull and transport him from Ireland to Britain and help with the lifelong cost of keeping Benjy at the animal sanctuary.John Carmody said that Benjy’s plight is not only hitting the hearts of Irish people, but people worldwide and he has spoken to media sources from far and wide including RTE Radio One and Russia Today about the campaign.“I can’t believe how international this has gone,” said Mr Carmody.ARAN program co-ordinator Jackie Fitzgerald said that Benjy’s plight had touched hearts across the globe.“Like every other animal, Benjy should be to be free of death, pain and suffering.  We hope the people of Limerick get behind the fundraising drive to raise money to save Benjy,” she said.At the time of going to press terminally ill Simpsons co-creator Sam Simon had donated €6,250 to the cause. NewsBreaking newsLocal NewsLimerick appeal to save ‘gay bull’ BenjyBy Alan Jacques – November 18, 2014 671 Shannondoc operating but only by appointment Print TAGSAnimal Rights Action Network (ARAN)Benjyfeaturedgay bullJohn CarmodylimerickSam SimonThe Simpsons Proceedures and appointments cancelled again at UHL First Irish death from Coronavirus last_img read more

Experts see growing stranded asset threat for China’s continued coal plant financing

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享South China Morning Post:China risks being left behind as South Korea and Japan signal a shift away from financing overseas coal power in response to growing criticism over their support for the dirty fossil fuel.The three countries are the top global lenders for coal energy infrastructure, bankrolling projects beyond their borders through export credit agencies and developing new markets to export coal plant technology. But there are signs that Japan and South Korea may be preparing to scale back official support amid mounting pressure from the public and investors on environmental grounds.Japan announced last month that it would tighten funding criteria for foreign coal-fired power plants, and next month South Korean lawmakers will debate several bills aimed at banning overseas coal investment as part of a post-coronavirus “Green New Deal”.“This is profoundly serious, because it is an acceleration of a trend that is already established in global financial markets,” said Melissa Brown, the director of energy finance studies, Asia, at the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis. “It has a very strong economic foundation, which is that – based on virtually all of the coherent and credible evidence we have today – coal-fired power facilities that are brought into service in the next five years are extremely unlikely to have a productive, profitable economic life.”China has an outsize impact on development financing for coal. From 2000-2019, its two global policy banks – the China Development Bank and the Export-Import Bank of China – issued loans totaling US$51.8 billion for coal energy projects around the world, according to the Global Development Policy Centre at Boston University.In comparison, Japan spent US$26 billion financing 36 overseas coal-fired power plants between January 2003 and April 2019, the Japan Centre for a Sustainable Environment and Society estimated. South Korean public financial institutions, meanwhile, supported 24 overseas coal projects with US$10 billion from 2008 to 2018, according to Solutions for Our Climate (SFOC), a Seoul-based non-profit organisation.[Harry Pearl]More: China slow to curb coal financing as Japan, South Korea ‘accept new reality’ on phasing out fossil fuels Experts see growing stranded asset threat for China’s continued coal plant financinglast_img read more