Pasadena Bookstores Pushed to Brink by Pandemic

first_imgCommunity News Pasadena Bookstores Pushed to Brink by Pandemic By DAVID CROSS and BRIAN DAY Published on Tuesday, October 20, 2020 | 2:25 pm STAFF REPORT First Heatwave Expected Next Week STAFF REPORT Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Top of the News HerbeautyThis Trend Looks Kind Of Cool!HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyWant To Seriously Cut On Sugar? You Need To Know A Few TricksHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty10 Vietnamese Stunners That Will Take Your Breath AwayHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty6 Strong Female TV Characters Who Deserve To Have A SpinoffHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyThese Fashion Tips Are Making Tall Girls The Talk Of The TownHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty9 Of The Best Metabolism-Boosting Foods For Weight LossHerbeautyHerbeauty Community News faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Donald CommunityPCC- COMMUNITYVirtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPasadena Public WorksPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS More Cool Stuff Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. 20 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it center_img Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  CITY NEWS SERVICE/STAFF REPORT Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Community News Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Business News Bookstores across the Southland and the nation have long been challenged by a changing marketplace increasingly dominated by online giants such as Amazon, but the increased pressure placed upon local brick-and-mortar booksellers by the ongoing pandemic is pushing some to the brink of closure.Vroman’s Bookstore, which has been in Pasadena for 126 years, reached out to the community last month for support after announcing the pandemic had left it teetering on the edge of collapse.Archives Books shut down early in the pandemic.Founder and owner John Wipf said he had already been considering retirement upon turning 70 when the pandemic struck.Had he not elected to shut down, “I can tell you, I would have gone under,” he said.“I was in the process of retiring and then we had gone into March and I was able to get out of my lease, so I went for it,” he said. “And then, over probably the next week, everything closed up. People started taking this virus seriously.”The pandemic has been hard on many businesses, he added.“I can’t see how any small business isn’t taking a big hit,” Wipf said.Long before anyone had heard of COVID-19, the bookselling industry was in a state of adapting to survive, Wipf said.“I had to move twice. And I had to change how I did business,” he said. But in the end, “I’ve just been really fortunate for 40 years. I started in 1980 in Pasadena.”The Battery Book & Music in Pasadena remains open, but owner Richard West said the past months have been a struggle.“I applied for a loan. I also work an online business a little bit, so I was able to come into my store every day,” he said.“Once they allowed us to open again with masks on… it’s been hellish at times. There was a couple of weeks, even just a couple of weeks ago, where I had just had a handful of customers.”But he said he was confident his business wasn’t going anywhere soon.“I’m not worried or panicked. I know we’re in it for the long haul,” West said.“I’ve been in this business since ’91. I know that it has its ups and downs and you just have to kind of work with your landlord if you can,” he said. “And so far, they have been excellent, actually. And that really, really helps.”Not being able to hold events at the store has also been a significant hindrance to business, West said. “That was part of my business. Those events brought people in.”West said as a one-person operation, he feels better prepared to weather the pandemic than some other businesses.“I think people who have employees, that’s a whole other story. I worry about my cohorts at Book Alley or at Vroman’s.“It would be nice to go back to the old days, or just even a year ago,” West said. “But I get it. People are scared. SoI think once we get a vaccine, we’ll be OK.”See also:Community Rallies Around Pasadena’s Pandemic-Stricken Vroman’s Bookstore Subscribe Make a comment Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadenalast_img read more

OC official digs into reasons for Black History Month

first_img Registration set for engineering camp Odessa College Student Activities Coordinator Nadia Rivas listens to the discussion. Dr. Denise K. Perdue was lecturing about “Why We Celebrate Black History Month” during a Lunch & Learn session in the Wood Math and Science Building at Odessa College Wednesday, February 7, 2018. The event was part of Odessa College’s Black History Month events. Local NewsEducation OC official digs into reasons for Black History Month Dr. Denise K. Perdue talks about “Why We Celebrate Black History Month” during a Lunch & Learn session in the Wood Math and Science Building at Odessa College Wednesday, February 7, 2018. The event was part of Odessa College’s Black History Month events. Facebook Twitter Odessa College Student Activities Coordinator Nadia Rivas listens to the discussion. Dr. Denise K. Perdue was lecturing about “Why We Celebrate Black History Month” during a Lunch & Learn session in the Wood Math and Science Building at Odessa College Wednesday, February 7, 2018. The event was part of Odessa College’s Black History Month events. Digging into why Black History Month is celebrated, Odessa College Executive Director of Student Learning Resources Denise Perdue dug back to the sources — Carter G. Woodson and President Gerald Ford.Woodson was born to freed slaves. He wanted to find out more about himself, so he traveled the country and noticed that other people wrote down their histories, so why not African Americans. The biography.com website said Woodson dedicated himself to black history and lobbied to establish Black History Month.It was Ford who established the month in 1976 “calling upon the public to ‘seize the opportunity to honor the too-often neglected accomplishments of black Americans in every area of endeavor throughout our history,’” the History.com website said.Perdue said it was illegal for black people to learn to read and write and the lives of anyone who taught them were in danger, as well. But Woodson saw others chronicling their history and thought it was equally as important for African Americans. Dr. Denise K. Perdue talks about “Why We Celebrate Black History Month” during a Lunch & Learn session in the Wood Math and Science Building at Odessa College Wednesday, February 7, 2018. The event was part of Odessa College’s Black History Month events. 1 of 5 Odessa College Student Activities Coordinator Nadia Rivas listens to the discussion. Dr. Denise K. Perdue was lecturing about “Why We Celebrate Black History Month” during a Lunch & Learn session in the Wood Math and Science Building at Odessa College Wednesday, February 7, 2018. The event was part of Odessa College’s Black History Month events. Pinterest WhatsApp By admin – February 9, 2018 center_img OCA top 2 were ESL students Twitter Home Local News Education OC official digs into reasons for Black History Month Previous articleAlpine celebrates St. Valentine’sNext articleSULLUM: Poland’s Holocaust bill is a hate speech ban admin RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR NAACP History.Black History Month. Pinterest Noel earns award Dr. Denise K. Perdue talks about “Why We Celebrate Black History Month” during a Lunch & Learn session in the Wood Math and Science Building at Odessa College Wednesday, February 7, 2018. The event was part of Odessa College’s Black History Month events. Director of Student Life Urisonya Flunder said so much of black history was suppressed intentionally because of slavery and other things happening.He chose February as the month for Black History Month because it includes the birthdays of abolitionist Frederick Douglass and President Abraham Lincoln.Perdue’s presentation also included showing a clip of an interview with actor Morgan Freeman and Mike Wallace about Black History Month. Freeman says he thinks the month is ridiculous. Wallace asked him how we can get rid of racism and Freeman said we should quit talking about it.A poll of those attending the presentation in the Wood Math and Science Building at Odessa College Wednesday showed 57 percent agreed and 43 percent disagreed. The cell phone poll was anonymous and answered by about nine people.She added that education is an opportunity to change people’s mindsets.Perdue said she first heard of Woodson from an instructor at Hopkinsville Community College in Hopkinsville, Ky. Perdue, who started her academic career at the school, had already earned a bachelor’s degree and was working toward a master’s.She told the instructor she wanted to do something different for Black History Month.“I’d never heard of him,” Perdue said of Woodson. “My parents had not heard of him. My grandparents hadn’t heard of him, so that search began. It was exciting and thrilling,” Perdue said.When she was teaching, Perdue said people wouldn’t shake her hand when she greeted them and she would be told when people talked to her on the phone that they didn’t know she was black. But she said at the end of a term, she has never had someone stay the same.William Council, who used to be in prison ministry, said people look for identity and someplace to belong. Council added that he has learned a lot about the contributions blacks have made to society for everything from traffic lights to water guns.“I thought it was incredibly informational,” Council said of the presentation. “I think Miss Denise did an awesome job of really breaking down the history of Black History Month and why it’s relevant today and bringing that information full circle to have a very in-depth conversation about that and how it relates to us today where we are.”More Information WhatsApp Facebook Texas Fried ChickenUpside Down Blueberry Pie CheesecakeSummer Spaghetti SaladPowered By 10 Sec Croissant Breakfast Sandwich Casserole NextStay last_img read more

Councillor concerned over plans to centralise Senior Alert Scheme

first_img Twitter Previous articleTwo men bailed following Derry drug arrestsNext articleSemi Final defeat for LYIT Gaa Men News Highland Pinterest RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Twitter Man arrested on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences in Derry By News Highland – November 26, 2014 75 positive cases of Covid confirmed in North A Donegal Councillor says plans to centralise the Senior Alert Scheme could lead to long delays in older people, who have been the victims of crime, being provided with an alarm system.Currently if an older person is the victim of a burglary, local community groups can provide personal monitered alarms in a matter of days.Councillor Martin McDermott says this can give the victim of crime some comfort that their home is more secure.He says centralising the process could lead to delays of weeks in alarms being provided:Audio Playerhttp://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/11/Derm.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. Gardai continue to investigate Kilmacrennan fire Google+ Newscenter_img Pinterest WhatsApp Councillor concerned over plans to centralise Senior Alert Scheme Google+ WhatsApp Facebook Main Evening News, Sport and Obituaries Tuesday May 25th Facebook Further drop in people receiving PUP in Donegal 365 additional cases of Covid-19 in Republic last_img read more

Aba welcomes proposal to increase flexibility for Pensionsfonds

first_imgGermany’s pension fund association (aba) has endorsed government proposals to give Pensionfonds more flexibility. In August, the Labour Ministry (BMAS) called for stakeholder comment on a proposal that would allow the relaxation of minimum guarantees during the payout phase from a Pensionsfonds. In Germany, defined contribution (DC) funds have to be set up with a minimum guarantee, or Beitragszusage mit Mindestleistung, and, if a Pensionsfonds is used as a vehicle, the payout phase has to contain an insurance element.At present, Pensionsfonds are used infrequently on retirement but rather as a financing instrument for pension payouts. The BMAS’s new proposal aims to change the norm by allowing the application of a 0% discount rate on all pensioners’ assets in Pensionsfonds.In a statement, the aba welcomed the changes, as Pensionsfonds with minimum guarantees are considered the “German alternative to international defined contribution plans”, which enjoy greater flexibility.One of the main advantages of the government’s proposal, according to the aba, is that it “makes it possible to have a less restrictive and more flexible asset allocation, which is particularly fitting in light of the low-interest-rate environment.”If the proposal is passed, Pensionsfonds will no longer require separate asset allocations for active and retired members.“This will create opportunities for higher returns,” the aba said.The association, however, did raise a number of concerns, most notably the volatility of pension payouts that people “will have to deal with”.It said German workers had grown accustomed to “very predictable” pension payouts and that the new regulation would guarantee only a minimum, with “volatile top-up elements”.Further, it warned that company liabilities could increase in certain cases under the new regulations compared with the current ones.Overall, however, the new regulation can help “increase acceptance of and participation in the second pillar”, the aba said.Another proposal by the BMAS would allow certain employees to opt out of the protection offered by the insolvency fund PSV.The aba said it had questions regarding taxation on this issue, but it generally welcomed the proposal.last_img read more