For the record

first_img 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!,An editorial Friday incorrectly reported the amount that former Fleishman-Hillard executive Doug Dowie overbilled the L.A. Department of Water and Power. The judge in his trial ruled the amount to be about $529,000. An editorial Friday incorrectly reported the amount that former Fleishman-Hillard executive Doug Dowie overbilled the L.A. Department of Water and Power. The judge in his trial ruled the amount to be about $529,000.last_img

Big Texas Win on “Critical Thinking”

first_imgStudents in Texas schools will now have more opportunities to hear the flaws in Darwinism as well as evidences for it.  After months of acrimonious debate, the Texas State Board of Education adopted science standards that require students learn to “analyze, evaluate and critique scientific explanations” including theories of evolution and the origin of life.    The new language replaced the long-standing wording of teaching the “strengths and weaknesses” of evolution.  Though Darwin critics were advocating to retain the old language (the website of Texans for Better Science Education is StrengthsAndWeaknesses.org), they feel the new language is even stronger.  The general critical thinking language states:…in all fields of science, analyze, evaluate and critique scientific explanations by using empirical evidence, logical reasoning, and experimental and observational testing including examining all sides of scientific evidence of those scientific explanations so as to encourage critical thinking by the student.As applied to evolutionary theory, this means students will have opportunity to “analyze, evaluate and critique” hypotheses of natural selection, mutations and common ancestry.  They will also be able to evaluate evolutionary explanations for the “sudden appearance, stasis, and sequential nature of groups in the fossil record,” the “complexity of the cell,” and the “formation of simple organic molecules and their organization into long complex molecules having information such as the DNA molecule for self-replicating life.”  They can also “discuss scientific hypotheses for the origin of life by abiotic chemical processes in an aqueous environment through complex geochemical cycles given the complexity of living organisms.”    As reasonable and straightforward as this language may sound to outside observers, the evolutionists are treating the vote as a defeat for them and a victory for supporters of intelligent design.  The NCSE was just crowing over defeat of the “strengths and weaknesses” language by a tie vote (and therefore defeat) on March 26, but was angry at the final vote today, March 27.  On the other side, Evolution News and Views blog of the Discovery Institute, which has been giving the blow-by-blow account of the proceedings, calls the vote a big win, “a huge victory for those who favor teaching the scientific evidence for and against evolution.”  Undoubtedly, cheers and boos will soon be heard in the press.  Evolution News is keeping a running blog on whether the reporting in the media is accurate or not.    What happens in Texas matters to the whole country.  Texas is the biggest textbook buyer in the United States.  Authors of biology textbooks will not wish to write one version for the Lone Star State and another for other states.  The textbooks written to incorporate the new standards, therefore, will likely become normative for the rest of the country.    The NCSE and other pro-Darwin groups had tried to persuade the SBOE that their opponents had religious motivations.  John West of the Discovery Institute was quick to point out that the vote is a victory for fairness and balance, not the teaching of creationism or religion.  “Contrary to the claims of the evolution lobby, absolutely nothing the Board did promotes ‘creationism’ or religion in the classroom.  Groups that assert otherwise are lying, plain and simple.  Under the new standards, students will be expected to analyze and evaluate the scientific evidence for evolution, not religion.  Period.”  The chairman of the Texas State Board of Education, Don McLeroy, has written a commentary in The Statesman explaining why the new definitions will help teachers and students weigh testable evidence instead of ideology.It is a sad measure of our cultural demise when getting a vote in favor of fairness and critical thinking requires a herculean effort against a dogmatic establishment.  Much as we celebrate with those who won, consider what a small advance this is.  The Darwinist totalitarian regime has imposed such thought control on the scientific and educational institutions they can hardly think straight.  This should have been common sense.  In what other branch of inquiry is it normal for students to have predigested conclusions poured down a funnel into their skulls?  Of all subjects, science should be the most open to critical thinking.  Not so with Darwinism.    Less than a century ago the Darwinists were clamoring for fairness themselves.  They wanted to defend the right of a teacher to teach their views in the classroom.  Now that the shoe is on the other foot, they have redefined one-sided dogmatism to whole new levels of shame (see 12/16/2008).    They’re like crooks who rob a radio station by begging at the door that they just want a minute to give their commercial on the air, because they want fairness and it isn’t right for the owners of the station to give just one point of view.  After enough pressure, the exasperated manager lets the Darwinists in.  They grab the manager, owner, broadcasters and toss them outside and lock the door.  Then they take over the microphones and announce that the station is under new management.  While the rightful owners are banging at the locked doors and windows, the usurpers commandeer the airwaves, teaching fairy tales about how dirt came to life and bacteria became human.  The owners spend years in court trying to get the usurpers to open the door.  The courts (in cahoots with the crooks) rule against the owners over and over, often by one-vote margins.  Finally, by a close vote, after months of wrangling, a board still doesn’t let them in, but grants them one small concession: allowing them to insist that the stories the Darwinist usurpers tell on the air can be analyzed and critiqued by the public.    That is where this vote brings us.  It does not restore the rightful owners (i.e., the taxpayers) to their place.  It does not allow two sides to be heard.  It only means that the listeners will no longer be forced to endure propaganda taught as fact; they will have the right to think about it critically in light of empirical evidence.  In today’s mad, mad world, one can be grateful for any glimmer of sanity, no matter how slight.    This “huge victory” is just a cloud the size of a man’s hand on the horizon (I Kings 16).  Whether it ends the drought of reason will require much more work and providence.  Lovers of fairness should take heart at the hard work and persistence of Texans for Better Science Education and the many who testified, wrote the Board and assisted in the effort in numerous small ways.    New Scientist is all paranoid that this vote “leaves loopholes for teaching creationism.”  No it doesn’t.  It takes away the dogmatism of the Darwin Party and calls their presumptive authority to account.  They can no longer merely tell students their story is plausible.  They will have to provide evidence.  This is a good thing that everyone should welcome – parents, teachers, scientists.  The taxes in Texas should promote facts and a nexus of fair-minded people, not an axis of hacks devoted to dogmatism.  Let’s work to make last year’s movie Expelled represent the rock bottom of Darwinist intolerance, about which, from the vantage point of a new era of critical thinking, society will look back at with disgust and promise, “never again.”The stars for right, are big and bright,deep in the heart of Texas,The science sky is wide and high,deep in the heart of Texas.The sage advice is so precise,deep in the heart of Texas,Reminds me of, the vote I love,deep in the heart of Texas.Fanatics wail, along the trail,deep in the heart of Texas,Reporters beat around the bush,deep in the heart of Texas.The righteous cry, “Ki-yip-pee-yi,”deep in the heart of Texas,The bigots brawl, and crawl and bawl,deep in the heart of Texas.(Visited 27 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read 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Kalmbach Feeds to acquire Cumberland Valley Cooperative

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Kalmbach Feeds, Inc. (KFI) of Upper Sandusky, OH and Cumberland Valley Cooperative (CVC) of Shippensburg, PA are excited to announce that an agreement has been reached and approved by the shareholders of CVC for KFI to acquire a majority of the assets of CVC. Both companies have a long history in agriculture and believe that this opportunity represents a great platform for KFI to continue expanding its market while benefiting the agricultural community that CVC has served for over 80 years.“We are looking forward to the opportunities this acquisition will present. This market is an outstanding agriculture area and we are excited for the opportunity to serve both current and future customers,” said, Paul Kalmbach, KFI president.The transaction is expected to close in late September, and there will be no disruptions to the business during closing. KFI is committed to honoring the grain contracts and grain bank system that CVC has used historically to insure a smooth transition for customers. Both parties want to assure that customers will continue to have options for quality products and great service for many years to come.“CVC has a long history of serving this community through employment, high quality products, and customer service,” said Vernon Horst, Chairman of the CVC Board. “We believe that we have found a partner that can continue this tradition while providing much needed growth for the future.”last_img read more

Vlade Divac headlines 2019 Basketball Hall of Fame class

first_imgTexas Tech turns to Matt Mooney, defense to top Michigan State Weatherspoon, who was elected by the women’s committee, was a five-time WNBA All-Star for the New York Liberty who was the first in the league to reach 1,000 points and 1,000 assists. She led Louisiana Tech to an NCAA championship in 1988.Jones and Westphal were the other players elected by the North American committee. Jones was an eight-time NBA All-Defensive first team pick and four-time All-Star with the Philadelphia 76ers, winning a title with them in 1983. Westphal was a five-time All-Star who won a championship with the Boston Celtics in 1974.Fitch coached in the NBA for 255 seasons, leading the Celtics to a title in 1981 and still holding the franchise’s best winning percentage at .738. The other election by the North American committee was the Tennessee A&I teams that won NAIA championships in 1957, 1958 and 1959. The program now known as Tennessee State was the first to win three straight titles in any college division.Attles was a direct election by the contributor committee. He played for the Philadelphia Warriors from 1960-71 and later was a coach, executive and ambassador for the organization. Cooper, who died in 1984, was directly elected by the early African American pioneers committee. He was an All-American at Duquesne in 1950 and the first African American player drafted by an NBA team. Braun, directly elected by the veterans committee, died in 2010. He was a five-time NBA All-Star who won a title with the Boston Celtics in 1962.Wayland Baptist, elected directly by the women’s veterans committee, was among the first women’s programs to award scholarships. Under the guidance of coach Harley Redin, the small school in West Texas won 131 straight games from 1953-58 and 10 national championships overall.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Vlade Divac. APMINNEAPOLIS — The longest active streak of missing the NBA playoffs belongs to Sacramento, where general manager Vlade Divac has been trying to return the Kings to the league’s elite over the last four seasons.Back when the slick-passing Serbian big man was in the paint, the Kings had quite the run. For his impact on the NBA as one of the pioneering Eastern Europeans, Divac was announced Saturday as one of the 12 honorees in the 2019 class of the Basketball Hall of Fame.ADVERTISEMENT Duterte wants probe of SEA Games mess DA eyes importing ‘galunggong’ anew Philippine Arena Interchange inaugurated Hontiveros presses for security audit of national power grid PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games PLAY LIST 02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss Cayetano: Senate, Drilon to be blamed for SEA Games mess “We created something special there, the first day of training camp that led us,” said Divac, who played for Sacramento from 1998-2004, with a peak in 2002 when the Kings lost to the Los Angeles Lakers in overtime of Game 7 of the Western Conference finals. “For six years, we were the most exciting team in the league and really played basketball the right way.”The class will be enshrined at the Hall of Fame in Springfield, Massachusetts, on Sept. 6. Selected this year with Divac were NBA players Carl Braun, Chuck Cooper, Bobby Jones, Sidney Moncrief, Jack Sikma and Paul Westphal, NBA coach Bill Fitch, NBA contributor Al Attles, WNBA player Teresa Weatherspoon, the 1957-59 teams from Tennessee A&I and the Wayland Baptist University program.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSPalace wants Cayetano’s PHISGOC Foundation probed over corruption chargesSPORTSSingapore latest to raise issue on SEA Games food, logisticsDivac, who was elected directly by the international committee, played 16 years in the NBA, including eight with the Lakers. The 7-foot-1 Divac had his jersey retired by the Kings after helping them start a streak of eight straight postseason appearances upon his arrival. They never advanced past the conference finals, a surge that coincided with the Lakers dynasty of Kobe Bryant and Shaquille O’Neal.One of Divac’s fellow starters on those Kings teams was Chris Webber, who wasn’t included in the class. Now an analyst for CBS Sports, Webber quickly sent Divac a congratulatory message after the announcement in Minneapolis at the Final Four.center_img LATEST STORIES MOST READ Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting SEA Games hosting troubles anger Duterte Panelo: Duterte ‘angry’ with SEA Games hosting hassles Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. View comments “For the last five or six days when I found out I was going to be there, I was only hoping that he was going to be next me,” Divac said. “I’m sure it’s going to happen down the road, but it would be awesome if he was right next to me.”Moncrief and Sikma, who were elected by the North American committee, were teammates with the Milwaukee Bucks from 1986-89. The seven-time All-Star Sikma, who won an NBA title in his second season with the Seattle SuperSonics, set a record with the Bucks in 1988 as the only center in history to lead the league in free-throw percentage at 92.2. Sikma is now a consultant with the Toronto Raptors, who are in second place in the Eastern Conference behind the resurgent Bucks.“My hope is we get in the conference finals and we’re facing the Bucks, and then I’ll kind of keep my thoughts to myself a little bit,” Sikma said, smiling.Moncrief was a five-time All-Star and two-time NBA Defensive Player of the Year in the mid-1980s for the Bucks, who lost in the Eastern Conference finals three times during his career. Moncrief also reached the Final Four in his final season at Arkansas, 1978-79, under coach Eddie Sutton, for whom he gave credit for instilling in him the fundamentals that carried him to professional success.“You’d take a four-hour practice: three hours on defense. Seriously,” Moncrief said. “And they wonder why I couldn’t shoot when I got to the NBA! I didn’t shoot. I just played defense.”ADVERTISEMENTlast_img read more

a month agoNorway sensation Erling Haaland dreams of Leeds glory

first_imgNorway sensation Erling Haaland dreams of Leeds gloryby Paul Vegasa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveNorway sensation Erling Haaland dreams of winning the Premier League title with Leeds United.The 19-year-old, son of former Leeds and Manchester City defender Alf-Inge, scored a hat-trick in RB Salzburg’s 6-2 win over Genk.Haaland has been linked with with Manchester United after playing under Ole Gunnar Solskjaer at Molde.But speaking to Norwegian newspaper Aftenpostenback in 2017, Haaland said: “I want to be the best. The dream is to win the Premier League with Leeds.”As well as that, the goal is to be a better player than Dad was. I hope to get more international matches than he did.” TagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more