County to cancel and renegotiate food inspection agreement with Notre Dame

first_imgSt. Joseph County will cancel and then renegotiate a recently announced agreement with Notre Dame that would have allowed the University to conduct its own health inspection for on-campus food establishments, the South Bend Tribune reported Thursday.On Wednesday, David Keckley, the county Board of Health’s attorney, said the renegotiated agreement would seek to make the University’s health inspection reports publicly available.“I don’t think that’s probably a good arrangement for Notre Dame to conduct inspections and keep all their reports confidential — even if they have a right to do it,” Keckley said in the article.According to the article, the county board of health has had problems carrying out the recommended number of health inspections due to staff shortages. It would be helpful, the article said, if Notre Dame could do its own inspections.Keckley said the health department’s food services director, Carolyn Smith, had negotiated the agreement with the University. However, it was Notre Dame that had insisted on keeping the inspection reports confidential. Keckley stated Smith had told him that she heard from the state health department that Notre Dame could keep the reports confidential, but he did not believe that to be the case. He also said Smith reported Indiana University and all of its regional campuses do their own inspections and keep the reports confidential.According to the article, Smith told Keckley that Indiana’s health department lets IU and “all of its regional campuses, including IUSB, to conduct inspections and keep the records confidential.”Graham McKeen, IU’s public health manager, said this information was inaccurate, as although IU does its own inspections, it makes the information publicly available.The initial agreement between Notre Dame and the county called for the county to do any initial inspections of “new or remodeled food establishments” at the University, with the school taking over “routine” inspections from then on. The records of such inspections would have been available to the health department but not the general public.“If we’re going to have Notre Dame give us inspection reports and keep them here, we may have to turn them over on any [public] request,” Keckley said in the article.Notre Dame signaled it was willing to renegotiate the agreement, according to the article.“[The original agreement] contains substantial errors, including language concerning access to public records,” University spokesman Dennis Brown told the Tribune.Keckley also says he believes the first deal is not valid because the department’s health officer, Luis Galup, never signed it. Only Smith signed the original deal.Since the approval of the agreement, Galup said the county health department has not received any inspection reports from Notre Dame, though it is unclear if any inspections were carried out.Tags: Campus DIning, food inspections, St. Joseph County Health Departmentlast_img read more

GMP files annual report

first_imgGMP Employee GMP Employee 12 38 2006-12-04T15:51:00Z 2007-03-23T18:23:00Z 2007-03-23T21:19:00Z 1 210 1203 Green Mountain Power Corporation 10 2 1411 10.2625 Print 2.85 pt 2 MicrosoftInternetExplorer4st1\:*{behavior:url(#ieooui) } /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:”Table Normal”; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:””; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:”Times New Roman”;}March 23, 2007                  Upon request, shareholders may receivefree of charge a hard copy of the Annual Report on Form 10-K, includingcomplete audited financial statements, by emailing [email protected](link sends e-mail),calling 1-802-655-8410, or mailing Green Mountain Power, 163 Acorn Lane,Colchester, VT 05446, attn: Corporate Relations. GREEN MOUNTAIN POWER FILES ANNUAL REPORT ON FORM 10-K           COLCHESTER, VT& Green Mountain Power (NYSE: GMP)today announced that it has filed with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commissionits Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31,2006.  The filing was made on March 13, 2007and is available electronically on Green Mountain Power’s website at www.greenmountainpower.biz(link is external). Underthe section entitled “Who We Are,” users should select “Investors.”    Green Mountain Power(www.greenmountainpower.biz(link is external))is an electric utility operating company that transmits, distributes and sellselectricity and utility construction services in the State of Vermontin a service territory with approximately one quarter of Vermont’spopulation. It serves approximately 90,000 customers. -30-           For further information, pleasecontact Dorothy Schnure, Manager of Corporate Communications, at 802-655-8418.last_img read more

Consumers’ surprising views on the future of banking

first_imgThe usual view of the future of banking comes from industry observers and key players within the industry, who represent important viewpoints, to be sure. Yet consumers deal with banking issues frequently, if not daily. Banking is an essential and integral part of their lives.What do consumers think about the future of the industry?Rapidly changing consumer habits are one of the main forces behind the sweeping upheaval of the status quo in banking. MX, the digital transformation platform, conducted two consumer surveys in late 2019, each one generating just over 1,000 responses. These were distilled into two reports: The Ultimate Guide to Digital Transformation and The Ultimate Guide to the Future of Banking. The latter in particular offers much data on how consumers see banking changing, along with how they currently conduct their banking activities. The firm also offers some practical advice for digital transformation, summarized later in this article.As MX states, “two deep currents” are driving changes within the banking industry: More choice and less friction. Both are inseparably intertwined. Any consumer with access to the internet can search for “home loan rates” or “high-interest savings.” They can have hundreds of options available instantly — not only to peruse passively, but to actively engage with, in many cases, from their digital device. continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more