Noonan fears further pain for taxpayers’

first_img Previous articleThreat to future of St Paul’s Nursing HomeNext articleWillie in Wonderland admin House prices could lose half their value, says Goodbody’s THE Government has forced NAMA to use out-of-date, inaccurate information to  overvalue bank loans, according to Fine Gael’s Michael Noonan. Goodbody’s prediction that house prices will end up falling by 50% before levelling  out, he said, spells yet more  trouble  for  NAMA and further pain for taxpayers,  “The  prediction that house prices will lose half their value is desperate news for struggling homeowners.  This  outcome would send thousands more tumbling into negative equity.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up “The  consequences for  NAMA and the taxpayer are equally worrying. NAMA’s so-called  ‘business  plan’ is based on the assumption that property prices will  rise  from  the  levels  of  last November – the reference period for determining  the  current market values of the banks’ toxic developer loans that  NAMA  is  buying.“ But  according  to  Goodbody’s,  house prices have continued to plummet since then and are set to fall by a further 16% in the immediate future”.It was bad enough, continued deputy Noonan, that the taxpayer was being forced to pay far more than current  market  values  for  toxic  developer loans in a tumbling property market on the basis of their ‘long-term economic value.“But making matters even worse is the fact that NAMA is forced by the Government legislation to estimate  this  long-term value using outdated and inaccurate information.“Only last week  the  ESRI  predicted  that  the  Irish  labour force and population would  shrink  in the coming years because of recession-related emigration. This will mean lower demand for property. But in estimating the long-term value  of the property-related assets that it is buying, NAMA is prevented from using economic and demographic projections from beyond last January.  At  that  time, the CSO was still predicting a growing population for Ireland in the coming years”.There were, he continued, certain accountancy rules which require banks to  state  their  asset  value  on the date of audit, and prevent them from predicting a declining market, but that no such constraints applied to NAMA. “The  chances  of NAMA recovering taxpayers’ money, he concluded, seemed slimmer by the day. Advertisement WhatsApp Linkedin Emailcenter_img Twitter NewsLocal NewsNoonan fears further pain for taxpayers’By admin – July 22, 2010 507 Print Facebooklast_img read more

Swiss regulator: More pension funds to be underfunded after 2018 volatility

first_imgThe funding level of some Swiss pension funds is set to fall considerably after the equity market volatility of last year.Preliminary calculations relating to funds from the cantons of Zurich and Schaffhausen were presented by the BVS, the regional supervisory body for Pensionskassen and foundations in these two cantons.Speaking at the authority’s annual conference, Roger Tischhauser, director of the BVS, said that “a typical pension fund will report a lower funding level by 400 to 600 basis points because of the capital market developments” in 2018.This year, Tischhauser said he expected “an additional 12 or more pension funds” under BVS’ supervision to report underfunding in their 2018 annual reports. For 2017, the group of more than 750 pension funds supervised by the BVS showed a significant improvement in its funding position.Compared to 2016, the number of underfunded schemes fell from 10 to four. The funds with shortfalls in 2017 were smaller schemes with combined assets of CHF4bn (€3.3bn).Equity market volatility hit Swiss pension funds last year, a development also reflected in the industry indices compiled by UBS and Credit Suisse, as well as preliminary results published by Publica, Switzerland’s largest pension fund.Nevertheless, Tischhauser said he was impressed by how the average pension fund had developed over the past few years.In 2017, over 80% of all funds supervised by the BVS were 100% funded and around 50% had “already restocked the necessary funding buffers”, which had been emptied in the wake of the financial crisis, Tischhauser said.He highlighted public pension funds, which “can look back at seven years of very hard work” since they were legally transformed into entities independent of the canton’s authority.In total, the BVS oversees almost CHF300bn in occupational pension assets, more than one third of the total CHF850bn in the Swiss second pillar.Collective pension funds as systemic risk factorsTischhauser also defended proposals from Switzerland’s top finance regulator, the OAK, regarding new rules for collective pension funds, the Sammelstiftungen and Gemeinschaftseinrichtungen.He contradicted critics who recently spoke out against further regulation for this sector within the second pillar. The OAK wants to introduce additional risk reporting requirements for such plans.Tischhauser said a “consistent set of rules” was necessary for this sector.“In this segment, which is of systemic importance, financial stability has to be increased and for this we need a unified regulatory framework,” he said.He explained that, given the competition in this sector, collective pension funds on average “took more risks in their investments and made higher promises” than company pension funds not open to outside customers.last_img read more