Meeting John the Baptist in New Zealand

first_img Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA [Episcopal News Service] One of the things I love about traveling is how being in a different place can trigger epiphanies that startle and challenge me. On a recent trip to New Zealand, for example, I was surprised to meet John the Baptist, who appeared to me in the form of a tattooed Maori man.I first saw Gazza on a ferry ride to an island where I would join a tour on the culture of the Maori, the indigenous people of New Zealand. Even among the hundred or so people who crowded the boat, this man was difficult to miss, for he was literally covered in tattoos. Every visible part of him had been inked with elaborate swirls and colored patterns, including his face and shaved head. He was also muscular and stocky, a man you wouldn’t want to meet in a dark alley.So it was a surprise when we reached the island and I learned that the Tattooed Man was not only part of our group tour with TIME Unlimited — he was one of our guides. And in speaking to him, I found that he was not frightening at all. In fact, he is a gentle and deeply spiritual man.It turns out that the tattoos I had seen as bizarre and frightening were in fact the result of a religious vision. Gazza said that four years ago he had been visited by an eagle in the night, a bird so huge that it filled his bedroom. The eagle came back to him five nights in a row, until finally Gazza gave in. He knew what he was being called to do, because at 20 years of age he had received an earlier vision, one that had showed him the tattoos that would one day cover his head. “I held out as long as I could,” he said.Symbolic moko (tattoos) have long had an honored place in Maori culture. PHOTO/Lori EricksonGazza went to a tattoo artist and had his face, lips, and head marked with elaborate designs, which in the Maori language are known as “ta moko.” In doing so, he was following a long Maori tradition, for tattooing has been a valued part of that culture for many centuries. And because the head is considered to be the most sacred part of the body, to wear tattoos on the face is the ultimate statement of one’s Maori identity.As Gazza told his story, I became more and more fascinated. He explained the symbolism of his markings, describing how one arm told the story of his mother’s lineage and the other that of his father, and how his facial tattoos were patterned after those of Maori warriors of the past and how they symbolized the flow of the spirit from the sky to his mind and out through his mouth. He told how he is employed by the New Zealand Ministry of Education to teach Maori culture in Aukland schools, and how he mentors Maori adolescents in the criminal justice system.As he spoke, I realized that Gazza is an evangelist for his tradition. And I thought of another evangelist, John the Baptist, who also startled people with his wild and unconventional appearance. Both Gazza and John the Baptist remind us that following the path of the spirit sets us apart from others. We may be judged — and misjudged — as a result of the marks we bear.Back home in the U.S., I find my thoughts returning surprisingly often to my encounter with Gazza. Like many Episcopalians, I hesitate at proclaiming my faith too openly. We shy Anglicans feel that evangelism is best done discreetly, so as not to run the risk of making anyone uncomfortable.I want to remember the example of Gazza, this man who proclaims his Maori identity to the world so boldly, unafraid of how people will judge him. And I ask myself this question: how would I react if an eagle showed up in my bedroom one night, asking me to proclaim my Christian faith in this way?— Lori Erickson writes about inner and outer journeys at http://www.spiritualtravels.info/. She serves as a deacon at Trinity Episcopal Church in Iowa City, Iowa. Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Director of Music Morristown, NJ AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Featured Events Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Martinsville, VA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Featured Jobs & Calls Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Collierville, TN Meeting John the Baptist in New Zealand Rector Washington, DC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA center_img Submit a Press Release Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Belleville, IL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Tampa, FL Rector Bath, NC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC By Lori EricksonPosted Jan 6, 2012 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Albany, NY Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Pittsburgh, PA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Shreveport, LA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit an Event Listing This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs last_img read more

Rhode Island cathedral to suspend services on financial grounds

first_img TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab February 26, 2012 at 4:29 pm The Episcopal Church per se, and bishops especially, have been reluctant to review and try to renew the “idea” of great cathedrals. In too many cases, these edifices consume more and more time and energy in the repair, maintenance, and safekeeping, sapping the congregation of energy needed for ministry. There are other models “out there” for keeping great cathedrals as places of prayer, energy, music, gathering, and more: I know of NO diocese which has given serious thought and action towards moving into the 21st Century with eyes wide open and options aplenty. February 22, 2012 at 10:14 pm While I agree that we have to redefine “church” for the 21st century, the physical structure still has meaning. As a member of the choir of Christ Church Cathedral in Springfield, Massachusetts, I have often said that the building truly is a house of God. I believe that:He spoke to a Composer in the 1500’s and said, “write beautiful music to my glory.”He spoke to an Architect in the 1700’s and said, “design a building to my glory.”He spoke to a Builder in the 1800’s and said, “build the building to my glory.”And then he spoke to me and said, “Sing that song in that building to my glory.”You can pray anywhere, but only in a Cathedral can certain music truly soar toward the Heavens.My deepest condolences, Providence. Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Youth Minister Lorton, VA Posted Feb 22, 2012 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Submit a Job Listing Submit a Press Release February 25, 2012 at 8:28 am This truly saddens me. I resonate with deep gratitude for my parish in all of its rich ministries to both the local and global community. My prayers are with you. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN The Rev. Dr. Robert R. Hansel says: In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 the Rev. Jan Griffin says: Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Todd Gardner says: martha knight says: Rhode Island cathedral to suspend services on financial grounds Rector Pittsburgh, PA Featured Events Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis February 27, 2012 at 4:46 pm All “mainline churches” (TEC, UCC, ELCA, UMC and PCUSA) are having these same problems. We must look at the demographics; our birth rate (1.9 per couple) and immigration patterns. Neither support our growth. [Diocese of Rhode Island] The Episcopal Cathedral of Saint John in Providence, Rhode Island, announced Feb. 21 that, due to dwindling financial resources, its worship and pastoral services will be suspended after April 22.The St. John’s building at 271 North Main will retain its status as the cathedral of the Episcopal Diocese of Rhode Island. A cathedral serves as the seat of the bishop, the central place of pastoral and teaching ministries for all Episcopal churches in that diocese.“The cathedral congregation has experienced serious financial difficulty, and a decision was made to suspend services for now,” said the Rt. Rev. David Joslin, the cathedral’s acting dean. “This decision, of course, was not made lightly or quickly. And additionally, it does not permanently close the cathedral; it only ceases the usual Sunday services and pastoral care.”Joslin said that this financial situation has been evolving for many years, and has now come to the place where it needs to be addressed.Members of the cathedral congregation are being welcomed to join Grace Church on Westminster Street in Providence, or any of the 52 Episcopal churches in Rhode Island. There are six other Episcopal churches located in Providence.The Cathedral of Saint John, which was established as King’s Chapel in 1722, has been a continuing center for worship and outreach for 290 years. In 1794, the name of the church was changed to Saint John, and in 1929, the church became the official seat of the bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Rhode Island, receiving its designation as the Cathedral of Saint John.The last Holy Eucharist for the cathedral congregation will be held on Sunday, April 22, at 9:30 a.m., followed by a time to celebrate St. John’s many years of service. Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Smithfield, NC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA February 22, 2012 at 6:12 pm Sad to hear. The Chapter and Bishop need to explore other ways of “being church.” The maodel they have been pursuing is financially and administratively impossible for a dwindling congregation, but there ARE other models. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit an Event Listingcenter_img Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Bath, NC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Phil Rountree says: This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Albany, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Tampa, FL Comments are closed. Harry W Shipps says: Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Prof Willis H A Moore says: Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Emmetri Monica Beane says: Comments (9) Rector Belleville, IL Steven Long says: Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET February 25, 2012 at 10:13 pm I visited my son at college a few years ago in Providence. I was delighted to discover the cathedral was just about 10 blocks away. So, I called: no answer, no answering machine announcing the worship times. I went on my son’s computer: no website (!!!!!). How do you expect anybody to come to your church if you won’t communicate with the outside world? I went to the Episcopal Church instead right on the Brown campus, and there were about 25 people in this huge Gothic edifice at the main service. Zero college students in attendance. The era of just putting up an Episcopal Church sign and expecting people to show up ended about 50 years ago. The good old Episcopal Church soldiers on as if nothing has changed. “We need to raise more money,” they say. What they really need is to start attracting people again, and the money will follow… February 27, 2012 at 11:07 am You need to get used to similar annoucements from other parishes in the coming months and years as the ECUS continues to experience dwindling membership and accompanying lower giving. Leadership needs to ‘wake up’ and not ignor these alarming trends. Maybe this and other closures will cause leadership to recognize that their radical theology is pushing people out of the Church. There’s only so much the average parishoner can stand. The only people left will be a small secular group that can’t afford to fund even the basic expenses of congregational worship. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Cathedral Dean Boise, ID February 22, 2012 at 7:28 pm This just infuses me with a tremendous sense of gratitude for my parish and reminds me not to take the blessing of our parish for granted. It is a message about looking at what it means to be church in the 21st century. Is it about physical structures anymore? Or how much of being church is about buildings? Finally, it is a reminder to me about the importance of stewardship of money. In church life, we still seem uncomfortable talking about money but it is important that we have open dialogs about it just like we have in our own households. Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Press Release Service February 22, 2012 at 9:09 pm I’m sorry to read that resources have been dwindling for years, but it takes the suspension of services to admit that the situation needs to be addressed. The report is probably a simplification of actual concerns, but describes many churches I know of, where decline has been very evident for decades without any real attempts to change the situation.last_img read more

Mississippi diocese announces 5 nominees for bishop

first_img Submit an Event Listing Tags Featured Events Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest By diocesan staffPosted Mar 3, 2014 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit a Press Release Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Comments (3) Rector Smithfield, NC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Collierville, TN Comments are closed. Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Belleville, IL William A. Flint, PhD says: Mark Setzer says: This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Bishop Elections Mississippi diocese announces 5 nominees for bishop Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Shreveport, LA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET [Episcopal Diocese of Mississippi] The Standing Committee of the Diocese of Mississippi announced its slate of nominees for election as bishop coadjutor to become the 10th bishop of the Diocese of Mississippi. The announcement was made on Saturday, March 1.The nominees are:the Very Rev. Michael J. Battle, vicar, St. Titus Episcopal Church, Durham, North Carolina;the Rev. Marian Dulaney Fortner, rector, Trinity Episcopal Church, Hattiesburg, Mississippi;the Rev. Dr. R. Stan Runnels, rector, St. Paul’s Episcopal Church and Day School, Kansas City, Missouri;the Very Rev. Brian R. Seage, rector, St. Columb’s Episcopal Church, Ridgeland, Mississippi; andthe Rev. Ruth Woodliff-Stanley, rector, St. Thomas Episcopal Church, Denver, Colorado.A petition process for submitting additional names opens on March 3 and will close on March 7, 5 p.m. CST.  Complete information about the petition process and the petition form are available on the diocesan website.The slate is the result of a 10-month discernment process conducted by the Nominating Committee, made up of lay and clergy members representing all convocations of the diocese. The Nominating Committee was established and charged by the Standing Committee. With the announcement of the slate, a Transition Committee, also reporting to the Standing Committee and comprising lay and clergy members from across the diocese, implements the next stages of the election process.The nominees will be in Mississippi, April 7-11 and will be introduced at three open question-and-answer sessions. The sessions will be held at Coast Episcopal School, Long Beach on April 8; St. Andrew’s School, Ridgeland on April 9; and All Saints Church, Grenada on April 10.  While in Mississippi, the nominees will visit the John M. Allin Diocesan House, St. Andrew’s Cathedral, the Duncan M. Gray Camp and Conference Center and various ministries of the diocese.The election will take place on Saturday, May 3 at St. Andrew’s Cathedral in Jackson.  All canonically resident clergy of the diocese and lay delegates vote separately as “orders”; a majority of votes on the same ballot from both the clergy and lay orders is required for election.Pending consent from a majority of the Episcopal Church’s diocesan bishops and a majority of dioceses (via their Standing Committees), the consecration and ordination of the bishop-elect is scheduled to take place on Saturday, Sept. 27 at the Jackson Convention Complex in Jackson, with Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori presiding. March 4, 2014 at 11:35 am I’ve known Marian Dulaney Fortner for over 30 years. We first became friends during law school and then rented a house together while we were young lawyers. Marian has always been an inspiration to me and, probably not intentionally, made me want to be a better Christian. She woke up every morning in the wee hours to read morning prayer and then study the Bible. When she told me she wanted to become a priest, I was not surprised at all. She’s a natural! Now that she’s been nominated for bishop, again, I am not surprised at all. She’s smart; a natural leader; and exudes love to everyone she meets. She works very hard and, having been a lawyer, knows how to prioritize, and get things done. The most remarkable thing about Marian is that she accomplishes things without a bit of stress, at least to my eye. I encourage the voters to vote for Marianl I love her very much and I’m sure the diocese will too. Thanks for your consideration. Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem May Lipe Mintz says: Course Director Jerusalem, Israel TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Pittsburgh, PA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Martinsville, VA center_img Rector Knoxville, TN An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET April 4, 2014 at 9:18 am I like to have Marian Fortner as our bishop. I really appreciate her having the gay and lesbians together for a service, and I think that is wonderful. I approve same sex marriage in the churches and I hope she will let the priests bless the same sex marriage. I wish her luck! Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Washington, DC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Albany, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ April 29, 2014 at 4:16 pm Brian Seage is one of the most dedicated priest I have had the privilege to know. As rector of St. Columb’s, he was my priest. During a time when my father was so ill and dying, he was an ever present friend. I think Mississippi would be in good hands having Brian as their Bishop. He has done wonders working with the fine folks at St. Columb’s. The new Nave is a fulfillment of long years of dreaming and hard work. Thanks Be To God, the parish had Brian to lead them. Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Bath, NC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Press Release Service Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Tampa, FL Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Job Listing New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA last_img read more

Philippines: Mission in the midst of crisis

first_imgPhilippines: Mission in the midst of crisis Global partnerships deepen as typhoon response continues Rector Collierville, TN Director of Music Morristown, NJ Press Release Service Rector Tampa, FL Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Knoxville, TN The island of Bantayan counts children in its team of volunteers. The Diocese of Davao supports a continuing relief and economic redevelopment project in Bantayan. Photo: Gideon Bustamante[Episcopal News Service] Just over a week after the bishop of the newest diocese in the Philippines was consecrated on Nov. 23, 2012, Super Typhoon Bopha hit, killing more than 1,000 people and destroying homes and land. Almost 12 months later, in November 2013, came Super Typhoon Haiyan, killing as many as 10,000 people, making it one of the deadliest storms in the Philippines to date. As the Rt. Rev. Jonathan L. Casimina, bishop, put it, “We began our diocese with a typhoon, and we ended our first year with a typhoon.”Following destruction caused by Typhoon Bopha in 2012, representatives from the Diocese of Davao provided relief to residents of a small mountain village. Those residents asked the diocese for spiritual support, as well, and Chapel of the Transfiguration, pictured here, was born. Photo: Emily CherryIn between those environmentally catastrophic bookends came plenty of struggles for the Diocese of Davao in the Episcopal Church of the Philippines, which today is a year and a half old. While facing the usual start-up challenges of staffing, finances and vision-building, the diocese also had to look outward to its community, and quickly determine what role disaster response would play in its ministry. But it’s those struggles that have helped formed the new diocese, according to the bishop. “Even in crisis, there’s always an opportunity for mission,” said Casimina. “And that’s where our church is actually being defined.”In March 2014, staff from the Episcopal Diocese of Virginia visited the Episcopal Church in the Philippines, where Young Adult Service Corps volunteer Ashley Cameron of Virginia is stationed. “Our goal in making this trip to the Philippines was not only to visit with our YASCer Ashley Cameron, but also to learn how the Episcopal Church in the Philippines approaches its ministries,” said Buck Blanchard, the Diocese of Virginia’s director for mission and outreach. “The staff at the Episcopal Church Center had expressed interest in having more dioceses reach out and get to know the Episcopal Church in the Philippines,” he added. “It’s important for us to make those personal connections with our brothers and sisters in the Anglican Communion to see what unites us.”The Episcopal Diocese of Davao is located on the island of Mindanao, in the southern Philippines. When Haiyan – or Yolanda, as it is known locally – hit, it targeted victims a bit further north. As a group that had previous experience responding to natural disaster with Typhoon Bopha, the Diocese of Davao started to mobilize. Within one week, the diocesan youth and the Episcopal Church Women group had hosted a “Dinner for a Cause” to raise funds to support the typhoon victims. High-school students had gone door-to-door to collect more than $2,000 to donate to diocesan relief efforts.And on the day Typhoon Haiyan struck, the Diocese of Davao released a Letter of Appeal: “As people of faith we are yet again reminded of the powerful symbols of wind and water being both as destructive, as in the case of storms such as this super typhoon, as well as nurturing and life giving, especially in relation to scriptural and sacramental reflection of our liturgical life. Let us not be overwhelmed nor disheartened by all this tragic destruction we see and hear on the news.”The diocese identified in the tragedy an opportunity for ministry – an opportunity to claim an identity in the face of disaster. Casimina looked at the situation like this: “If we make ministry our priority, God will definitely provide for our needs.” So three weeks after the storm, the diocese organized a team of 30 people – including almost all of the diocesan staff members, some local clergy and a team of medical volunteers from the Diocese of Sebah in Malaysia – to take a disaster response trip to Bantayan Island.Coconut trees on the island of Bantayan will take a few more years to recover from the damage caused by Typhoon Haiyan. The Diocese of Davao supports a continuing relief and economic redevelopment project in Bantayan. Photo: Gideon BustamanteSituated in the Visayan Sea, Bantayan is a small island where almost all of the homes were destroyed. Most of the area was completely flooded, groves of coconut trees destroyed and farms leveled. “People were holding onto anything just to survive,” said Casimina. But media and relief efforts seemed to focus primarily on the area surrounding the city of Tacloban on Leyte Island, where the devastation was severe. So the Diocese of Davao decided to focus its efforts on Bantayan instead. The group distributed relief packs full of food, soap and supplies. The medical team performed minor operations, and provided medicine and supplies.The Episcopal Church in the Philippines does not have any congregations on Bantayan, where the population is mostly Roman Catholic. But, as Casimina explained, “It feels good to help your neighbor… but it feels better to help a stranger … It is incumbent on our part to really help, regardless of what their religion is. That is one of the strengths of the Episcopal Diocese of Davao.”Staff of the Diocese of Davao, pictured here with Ashley Cameron of the Young Adult Service Corps and Emily Cherry and Buck Blanchard of the Diocese of Virginia, joined together in a disaster relief project following Typhoon Haiyan. Photo: Emily CherryDuring their visit, the Virginia team toured several dioceses in the north to learn about their ministries and development projects, in addition to a trip to the Diocese of Davao in the south. “We specifically went to Davao because it is a brand new diocese that is looking for international friends,” said Blanchard. “We want to make sure that we are open and receptive to those sorts of opportunities to connect with people who are so eager to share their story.”The Virginia team spent time with national and diocesan staff, learning about rebuilding and rehabilitation efforts. “The Episcopal Church of the Philippines’ approach to typhoon relief is community-based – and by no means limited to Episcopal communities,” said Blanchard. The Diocese of Santiago, for example, is home to a center that produces food to be shipped to the typhoon victims. And in the Diocese of Davao, Blanchard added, “I was impressed at their willingness to be fearless and to simply go where they felt called, without a lot of hand-wringing – and that’s something we can learn from.”Now, five months after Haiyan struck, the Diocese of Davao continues its efforts on Bantayan island, moving from the development and relief phase of rebuilding structures to the economic rehabilitation phase. “Maybe we cannot provide all their needs, but at least we can do something to help their livelihoods,” said Gideon Bustamante, program coordinator in the Social Ministry Unit for the Diocese of Davao.On a recent trip back to Bantayan, Bustamante reported that, while many homes had been repaired, as much as 40 percent of the population was living in shelter boxes and tents in some cities. As a large fishing community, many residents’ incomes are suffering as a result of destroyed boats and nets, and the diocese has plans to help rebuild and refurbish those. They continue to distribute food and relief supplies, as well. Bustamante is coordinating with the national church office to discuss future plans for economic rehabilitation. And the group from Malaysia is making plans to return, along with a youth group from Japan.Members of St. Mary’s Chapel in the Diocese of Davao. Photo: Emily CherryTyphoons are a constant for the 7,000+ islands that make up the Philippines, and likewise, typhoon response is a top priority for the Episcopal Church of the Philippines, which became an official missionary district of the Episcopal Church in 1901 and later was a diocese of the Episcopal Church. In 1990, it became an independent province of the Anglican Communion, and continues today in a covenant relationship with the Episcopal Church. Following Haiyan, the Episcopal Church issued a statement about its approach to disaster relief: “If there is any bright spot to the catastrophic landscape brought about by the destructive typhoons, it is the immediate response of the Filipino people, even those directly affected, wanting to help fellow Filipinos.”The church’s response focuses on sustainability and community loan programs – and it’s a churchwide effort. Throughout the process, they’ve found, “Disasters usually bring out the best in communities,” said Floyd Lalwet, provincial secretary for the Episcopal Church in the Philippines. “Our people have become more open to giving to others,” said Lalwet. “There’s an openness to share not only money, but [products] of our own communities.”A long-standing partner of the U.S.-based Episcopal Church, the Church in the Philippines also has found support from the global community in its typhoon relief efforts, including from Episcopal Relief & Development. In the aftermath of Haiyan, the relief organization spearheaded fundraising efforts, in addition to providing rebuilding support. Sean McConnell and Sara Delaney of Episcopal Relief & Development recently returned from a trip to the Philippines. “When it comes to typhoon relief, the Episcopal Church in the Philippines exemplifies the best in asset-based methodology,” McConnell said. Individual communities analyze their resources and then determine how best they can use those assets to benefit others while sustaining themselves.Following destruction caused by Typhoon Bopha in 2012, representatives from the Diocese of Davao provided relief to residents of a small mountain village. Those residents asked the diocese for spiritual support, as well, and Chapel of the Transfiguration, was born. Here, members of Transfiguration welcome visitors. Photo: Emily CherryThe Diocese of Davao, through its ministry to typhoon victims, is an example of a church that has grown in its openness to giving. The diocese is proud of its Episcopal identity, and dedicated to nurturing it. “The Episcopal Church is too good not to be shared with others,” said Casimina. That maxim held true in the mountains surrounding Davao city. Following the December 2012 Typhoon Bopha, known locally as Pablo, diocesan representatives traveled to outlying areas to offer relief and rebuilding services. In one area, after receiving aid from the Diocese of Davao, the local residents wanted to join and worship in the Episcopal Church. “They asked us not only to sustain their material needs, but to sustain their spiritual needs, as well,” said Casimina. And so the Chapel of the Transfiguration was created in the Diocese of Davao. By reaching out to help a community, the diocese actually grew and strengthened their church.That mentality and outward-reaching focus has served the Diocese of Davao well in its inaugural year. They’ve created an ambitious agenda which features HIV/AIDs awareness, evangelism and communications, and environmental advocacy. Most recently, the diocese was awarded a United Thank Offering grant for the construction of a cathedral that also will host a sanctuary center for female and child victims of abuse.It’s this commitment to community that has made their typhoon relief efforts all the more powerful. The Diocese of Davao’s letter of appeal following Typhoon Haiyan continues: “Let not the howling winds nor crashing waves deter us from listening to the still, small voice of God whispering in our hearts to remember and lift up all the typhoon victims in our prayers and, in the compassionate spirit of Christ, to become his hands in reaching out and bringing comfort and consolation to their suffering and grieving hearts in anyway and manner we can in extending our help to them whether in cash or in kind assisting them towards eventual healing and rebuilding of their shattered lives in further strengthening their fervent hope for a new and better life.”Today, in the Diocese of Davao and the greater Episcopal Church in the Philippines, that commitment to heal, rebuild and strengthen continues.Learn about Episcopal Relief & Development’s response to Typhoon Haiyan here.— Emily Cherry is the communications director for the Episcopal Diocese of Virginia. An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Episcopal Relief & Development Rector Bath, NC Submit a Job Listing Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit an Event Listing Rector Washington, DC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Anglican Communion, Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Youth Minister Lorton, VA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Tags Rector Belleville, IL Rector Shreveport, LA Submit a Press Release Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS By Emily CherryPosted Apr 8, 2014 Featured Events Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Featured Jobs & Calls Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Hopkinsville, KY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Rector Columbus, GA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 last_img read more

Episcopal Relief & Development celebrates 75th anniversary

first_img Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Featured Events Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Shreveport, LA Tags Presiding Bishop Michael B. Curry preaches Nov. 11 during a special Eucharist at St. James’ Church in New York for Episcopal Relief & Development’s 75th Anniversary International Symposium. Photo: Cynthia L. Black[Episcopal News Service] Presiding Bishop Michael B. Curry began his sermon commemorating Episcopal Relief & Development’s 75th anniversary by quoting gospel singer Mahalia Jackson who sang, “‘If I can help somebody along the way … my living shall not be in vain.’”It was in this spirit and a joy and privilege to gather to give God thanks for “the miracle that God has done through the ministry, the work and the witness to the way of Jesus through Episcopal Relief & Development, the Presiding Bishop’s Fund for World Relief and the movement that gave birth to it all,” Curry said.Some 200 people gathered Nov. 11 at St. James’ Church on Madison Avenue in New York where Curry preached at a special Eucharist, the start of a daylong international symposium, a capstone event of Episcopal Relief & Development’s yearlong 75th anniversary celebration. Diocese of New York Bishop Andrew Dietsche presided at the Eucharist.“I am more and more convinced that God came among us in the person of Jesus of Nazareth to show us how to be reconciled with our God, the God who created and loves every one of us,” said Curry, who was installed as presiding bishop and primate of The Episcopal Church on Nov. 1. “And in so showing us how to be reconciled with God, he was showing us how to be reconciled with each other as children of that one God who is the creator of us all.“He was showing us how to be more than simple individual collections of self-interest. He was showing us how to become something bigger than our own selves. He was showing us that love can actually show us the way.”Jesus was showing us, said Curry, that we don’t have to be stuck in the nightmares of natural and human-made disasters and the nightmares of poverty and injustice.“We don’t have to be stuck in the nightmare, he came to show us that God’s got a dream for this world and we can live it if we work with God,” said Curry. “Jesus came to show us how to become more than simply the human race. That’s good, but it’s not good enough; he came to show us how to become the human family of God. And that, my brothers and sisters, is our hope, our salvation and the hope for the planet itself.”During his welcome, Robert W. Radtke, president of Episcopal Relief & Development, explained how the promises that Episcopalians make in the Baptismal Covenant are also the basis of the organization’s ministry.“Episcopal Relief & Development is a ministry founded on our deepest values as Christians. To seek and serve Christ in all people and to respect the dignity of every human being, these are promises that Episcopalians renew every time we baptize a new member of our church,” said Radtke, adding that those promises were renewed 10 days ago at Curry’s installation.During a welcome to the afternoon’s international symposium, Curry, who before being installed as presiding bishop chaired Episcopal Relief & Development’s board of directors and now serves as honorary chair, said, “As you well know, the theme ‘Healing a Hurting World’ really is at the heart of the work of Episcopal Relief & Development; that we as people of faith refuse to be satisfied with the world in the way that it is, but are unceasingly committed to a world as God intends for it to be.”The symposium, explained Curry, was “intended to engage the issues that are before us and how we as people of faith can engage those issues in a way that actually makes a difference for this world and the peoples of this earth.”Dr. Jim Yong Kim, president of the World Bank Group, delivers the keynote address at the 75th Anniversary International Symposium. Photo: Lynette Wilson/ENSIt began with a keynote address from Dr. Jim Yong Kim, president of the World Bank Group, followed by a discussion session and Q & A with Ray Suarez, the host of Al Jazeera America’s “Inside Story.”A physician and anthropologist, Kim worked in international development for more than 20 years and co-founded Partners in Health, a global health organization, with Dr. Paul Farmer. The pair met while studying together; Farmer introduced Kim to the work of liberation theologians at a time when the world was still caught up in the Cold War.After trying to make sense of the world through social theory, Kim and Farmer kept coming back to the question, “what is to be done in the world?” And they were looking for an organizing principle around which they could move forward, take action and feel that they were doing the right thing, said Kim.The pair was inspired by people like Gustavo Gutiérrez Merino, the founder of liberation theology, who worked with the poor in Peru.It’s “work that put substance to this notion of a preferential option for the poor,” he said, adding that liberation theologians developed a simple method based on seeing, judging and acting when engaging poor communities, whereby work in poor communities begins not with programs but rather by asking, “What is the nature of your reality? What do you make of that reality and what is to be done?”Kim, who became president of the World Bank in 2012, explained that one of its goals is to end extreme poverty by 2030.“We are the first generation in human history that can see the end of extreme poverty,” said Kim, adding that in 1990, 36 percent of the people in the world were living in extreme poverty and the world seemed stuck with that old notion of “‘the poor will always be with you,’ but now we’ve put an end date for poverty.”Now, for the first time in history, said Kim, the percentage of people living in extreme poverty has fallen below 10 percent. He said 9.6 percent is the estimate for 2015 but that’s still 700 million people, half of whom it’s estimated by 2020 will be living in so-called fragile and conflict states. That number is expected to rise to 90 percent by 2030.The role of faith-based organizations in alleviating extreme poverty “is extremely important,” he said.“We have three things that we need to do to lift everybody out of extreme poverty. The first is to grow the economy but not any kind of growth, we have to see economic growth that benefits the poorest; we have to invest in people. There’s overwhelming evidence that investing in health and education is not just good for health and education, it’s good for economic growth …. And finally, we need to ensure that people do not fall back into poverty by no fault of their own.”Dr. Jim Yong Kim’s keynote address was followed by a discussion session and Q & A moderated by Ray Suarez, the host of Al Jazeera America’s “Inside Story.” Photo: Lynette Wilson/ENSThe symposium also included presentations and panel discussions on supporting asset-based community development initiatives; ending sexual- and gender-based violence; empowering community volunteers; and leveraging faith-based partnerships.Utilizing local resources and expertise, Episcopal Relief & Development develops and assists programs aimed at overcoming poverty, hunger and disease. Through presentations, case studies and videos during the afternoon symposium, Episcopal Relief & Development showcased work in Angola, Burundi, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Guatemala, Kenya, Liberia, the Philippines, Sri Lanka and Zambia.Episcopal Relief & Development is an independent non-profit organization that works closely with Anglican Communion and ecumenical partners to help communities rebuild after disasters and develop long-term strategies to create a thriving future. The agency was formed 75 years ago as the Presiding Bishop’s Fund for World Relief in response to the suffering caused by war in Europe.“Over these years, Episcopal Relief & Development has played a significant role as an expression of the Gospel call to respond to human need with loving service,” wrote Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby, in an Oct. 22 letter of congratulations marking the organization’s anniversary, that was read during the Eucharist by the Rev. Rachel Carnegie, co-executive director of the Anglican Alliance.Episcopal Relief & Development President Robert W. Radtke welcomes participants to the organization’s 75th Anniversary International Symposium. The day began with morning Eucharist at St. James’ Church in New York and continued in the afternoon at the nearby Harold Pratt House. Photo: Cynthia L. Black“For 75 years, it has reflected its central vocation of proclaiming the good news of Jesus Christ through relief and development work, alongside partners and supporters across the Anglican Communion. Taking its inspiration from Matthew 25: 37-40, Episcopal Relief & Development has been standing with the local church in places of need,” said Welby. “In my visits to churches in the Anglican Communion, I have seen first-hand how local congregations, dioceses and provinces seek to tackle poverty, inequality and suffering due to conflict, natural disaster, disease and other causes.”Throughout 2015, Episcopal Relief & Development, along with Episcopalians and other friends and supporters, have celebrated “75 Years of Healing a Hurting World.” The anniversary was marked by an online weekly storytelling project and a traveling photo exhibit depicting the people and places around the world touched by Episcopal Relief & Development’s disaster relief, public health and economic development ministries.In September 2014, Episcopal Relief & Development kicked off a $7.5-million anniversary fundraising campaign. During the 75th anniversary celebration, Episcopal dioceses, schools and groups embarked on grassroots efforts to raise awareness and support for the organization’s life-giving programs. As of early November 2015, campaigns and donations from many committed individuals had generated $6.6 million to strengthen programs that touch the lives of more than 3 million people in 40 countries annually.“It’s been an extraordinary year,” said Radtke when asked by Episcopal News Service to reflect upon the yearlong anniversary celebration, adding that for 75 years Episcopal Relief & Development has benefited from the generosity of Episcopalians from all over the church.More importantly, said Radtke, Episcopalians’ reaction to the yearlong anniversary has been moving.“I think it is in the way Episcopalians feel attached to Episcopal Relief & Development. We’ve spent almost 18 months now with a photographic exhibit that’s been traveling around the country and the reaction that people have to our photographs and the stories that those photographs tell has been very powerful,” he said. “I think it’s been extraordinary today to hear both from Dr. Kim and then our panelists around the world about the work of faith groups and Episcopal Relief & Development in particular and the way it touches lives.”– Lynette Wilson is an editor and reporter for Episcopal News Service. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Press Release Service Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Belleville, IL Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit an Event Listing Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Hopkinsville, KY November 12, 2015 at 12:14 pm Refugees? Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Submit a Job Listing Featured Jobs & Calls Episcopal Relief & Development celebrates 75th anniversary Presiding Bishop preaches, World Bank president delivers keynote address Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Bath, NC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Comments (1) Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Curate Diocese of Nebraska Peggy Dobbins says: Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Tampa, FL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Pittsburgh, PA Comments are closed. In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Smithfield, NC By Lynette Wilson Posted Nov 11, 2015 Rector Albany, NY Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Knoxville, TN Episcopal Relief & Development last_img read more

Welsh churches to mark Earth Hour

first_img Rector Collierville, TN The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis [Anglican Communion News Service] Churches across Wales are being urged to switch off all lights or hold candlelit vigils to mark Earth Hour at 8.30 pm on Saturday 19 March. In doing so, they will join in with people across the world in what has been described as “a symbolic act to shine a light on climate change and the need to protect our environment.”An estimated half-a-million people across Wales took part in the 2015 Earth Hour, and half of Welsh local authorities supported the campaign. Key landmarks across the country, such as the Senedd, Caerphilly Castle and Welsh universities and churches went dark for the hour.They joined the international landmarks such as the Eiffel Tour and Sydney Opera House in 172 participating countries across the globe.Earth Hour is organised by the WWF charity and this year marks its 10th year. Participating churches are being asked to register their involvement and add themselves to the online Earth Hour map.The first to register is St Peter’s Church in Carmarthen town centre.“We’re encouraging all churches and parishioners to mark Earth Hour,” the Bishop of Swansea and Brecon, the Rt Revd John Davies, said. The bishop, who speaks on behalf of the Church in Wales’ environment group, CHASE (Church Action for Sustaining the Environment), added: “Switching off our lights for an hour or holding a candlelit service is a small gesture which has huge implications. It reminds us of the part all of us have to play in combating climate change and being responsible stewards of the wonderful gift that is creation.”Anne Meikle, thehead of WWF in Wales, said, “Earth Hour won’t solve climate change, but it presents a stepping stone to further action, by encouraging people to go beyond the hour.“Churches can play a vital role in raising awareness of Earth Hour, engaging with your community and inspiring others to live sustainably.” Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Smithfield, NC Tags Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Press Release Service Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Bath, NC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Washington, DC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Featured Events The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Director of Music Morristown, NJ Curate Diocese of Nebraska This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit an Event Listing Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Martinsville, VA Submit a Press Release Rector Albany, NY Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Hopkinsville, KY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Tampa, FL Posted Mar 11, 2016 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Welsh churches to mark Earth Hour Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Knoxville, TN Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Belleville, IL Anglican Communion last_img read more

Anglican Consultative Council begins with discussion of ‘consequences’

first_img Comments (9) susan zimmerman says: Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET The 16th meeting of the Anglican Consultative Council began April 8 in the Cathedral of the Holy Cross in Lusaka, Zambia. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service – Lusaka, Zambia] The Anglican Consultative Council members beginning their April 8-19 meeting here committed to working with Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby and the primates in the aftermath of the latter’s gathering during which they called for consequences for the Episcopal Church.However, it was at least initially unclear exactly what that commitment entails or if all of the ACC members understand it in the same way.Welby reported to the ACC members April 8 on the primates’ gathering, saying, “It is both my and the primates’ desire, hope and prayer that the ACC should also share in working through the consequences of our impaired relationships.”The confusion came later when, following table discussions among the members, ACC vice chair Elizabeth Paver told the group that Welby did pose a “direct request from the primates to us.”Anglican Consultative Council vice president Elizabeth Paver from the Church of England told a news conference April 8 that she had asked ACC members to commit “individually and collectively to work for the flourishing of all parts of the communion.” Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceTherefore, she said, the leaders of the ACC “ask you, really, are you individually and collectively willing to work together for mutual flourishing and in relationships?”“We decided that votes are … just divisive but we would like in Christian love and friendship in our Anglican way just to be able to say to our archbishop and affirm our beliefs as a body to work together with our primates on these difficult issues,” she continued. “If that be your will, would you just affirm it in an applause; if it is not, don’t.”Scattered applause followed but not all members participated.At a post-session news conference, held in the Anglican Cathedral of the Holy Cross where the ACC is meeting, Paver was asked to clarify the intent of her question and what she saw as its practical implications.The question she put to the ACC members, she said, was whether they were “willing individually and collectively to work for the flourishing of all parts of the communion, particularly in relational terms, that we walk alongside each other and we affirm each other.“And if the primates, who are our spiritual leaders, are prepared to do that through their difficulties, we wished just to give the members of the ACC an opportunity to say they too will put their efforts, their energies and their prayers and hopes in that, so this communion can stay together and flourish in all parts of the world.”A majority of the leaders of the communion’s 38 provinces – known as primates – during their January gathering called for three years of “consequences” for the Episcopal Church in response to the 78th General Convention’s decision to change canonical language that defines marriage as being between a man and a woman (Resolution A036) and authorize two new marriage rites with language allowing them to be used by same-sex or opposite-sex couples (Resolution A054).The primates said that they were “requiring” that for those three years the Episcopal Church not serve on ecumenical and interfaith bodies, not be appointed or elected to an internal standing committee, and “that while participating in the internal bodies of the Anglican Communion, they will not take part in decision-making on any issues pertaining to doctrine or polity.”Welby, who spoke for 30 minutes, said that he had already acted where he has responsibility and ability to act. He has appointed the task group asked for by the primates to maintain conversation among themselves with the aim of restoring relationships and trust. That group, he said, has a “very wide” representation from across the communion of male and female laity and clergy.The communion’s Standing Committee, which met in Lusaka April 6-7, said in a report to the ACC that it welcomed the task group. The members also “affirmed the relational links between the Instruments of Communion in which each Instrument, including the Anglican Consultative Council, forms its own views and has its own responsibilities.”Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby April 8 reports to the Anglican Consultative Council about the January meeting of the communion’s leaders – known as primates – during which those leaders called for consequences on the Episcopal Church for its decision to allow same-sex marriage. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceWelby made no specific mention of his recent removal, as part of the consequences, of the two Episcopalians who had been serving on two ecumenical bodies. The Rev. Amy Richter had been serving on the International Reformed-Anglican Dialogue and the Rev. Katherine Grieb was a member of the communion’s Inter-Anglican Standing Commission on Unity, Faith and Order.After Welby’s report, ACC members had a chance to ask clarifying questions. The only member who spoke was Episcopal Church of South Sudan and Sudan Archbishop Daniel Deng Bul Yak. He did not ask a question but instead spoke about his experience of the primates’ gathering, saying that “the spirit of God was in the room.“The ACC have to support the initiative already led by the Archbishop of Canterbury that managed to bring the primates together and make one statement,” he said, adding that the ACC ought to adopt the primates’ actions “to keep the church of God together.”The Episcopal Church’s three members are Connecticut Bishop Ian Douglas, whose term will end after this meeting; House of Deputies President the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings, attending her second meeting, and Diocese of the Virgin Islands Deputy Rosalie Ballentine, who was elected in June 2013 and thus attending her first meeting. Douglas is also finishing a term on the communion’s Standing Committee.“Our province is a member [of the ACC] and so therefore it’s our responsibility to attend and participate as representatives from a member province,” Jennings said prior to the meeting’s start. “As a member of the Anglican Consultative Council, I am bound to follow the constitution.”When, on April 8, ACC chair and retired Malawi Bishop James Tengatenga summarized the responsibilities of ACC members, the vast majority of whom are new to their role, he reminded them that the constitution requires their attendance at each meeting. Tengatenga had said earlier this year that the Episcopal Church members had the “right and responsibility” to attend the meeting and to vote.However, a group of Episcopal bishops and priests known as the Communion Partners recently called on the church’s ACC members to voluntarily comply with the primates’ consequences.Welby noted in his report to the ACC that the primates have “no legal authority over provinces” and that no one Instrument of Communion can make another instrument do or not do something.The Anglican Communion exists when the relationships at all levels within it allow for mutual discernment and interdependence, he said.The last ACC meeting received a 56-page report (beginning on page 33 here) about the relationships between the Instruments of Communion.In a letter dated March 16, Welby told the 38 primates that “the decisions we took in January can only have effect if they gain general ownership in the Communion, taking in laity, priests and bishops.”Forming the ACC-16 communityThe first three days of the ACC’s meeting are titled “establishing the ACC Community,” but the community is lacking some of its members.Four provincial leaders – Uganda Archbishop Stanley Ntagali, Nigerian Archbishop Nicholas Okoh, Kenyan Archbishop Eliud Wabukala and Rwandan Archbishop Onesphore Rwaje – have all said that their provinces will not send their ACC members to the meeting. (Ntagali’s statement is here, Okoh’s is here and Wabukala’s is here. Rwaje did not issue a statement about his decision.)However, Kenya’s three ACC members have come to the meeting. Wabukala acknowledged that decision on April 6, claiming that those three members had “been encouraged to disregard my spiritual counsel and attend this meeting.”“It seems that the rejection of the moral and spiritual authority of the Primates by the ACC Chairman, without public rebuke from the Archbishop of Canterbury, has become infectious and is encouraging further breakdown of godly order in the Communion,” he said in part.In addition, Archbishop Mouneer Hanna Anis from Jerusalem and the Middle East, who is also a Standing Committee member, has refused to attend. He recently said he would not attend the ACC meeting or the April 6-7 Standing Committee meeting here because of what he saw as the Episcopal Church’s “disregard” of the primates’ “consequences.” Saying he “did not mind” that the Episcopal Church would attend the ACC meeting, he implied, without naming Connecticut’s Douglas, the Episcopal Church was not honoring the intent of the primates’ “consequences” which said no Episcopalian should be “appointed or elected” to any of the communion’s internal standing committee. The ACC elected Douglas in 2009 to be one of its representatives on the Standing Committee.Ntagali, Okoh and Wabukala cited in part the Episcopal Church ACC members’ plans to participate fully in the Lusaka meeting and Tengatenga’s statement about their right to do so.While some Anglican Communion-watching blogs have reported that Welby’s March 16 letter asked all 38 primates to attend the meeting, he did not actually make that appeal. Rather the archbishop wrote that that it is his hope and prayer that “every province that is able will be represented in Lusaka.”Normally, primates attend ACC meetings only if they are on the Standing Committee. Then-Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori attended in 2009 and 2012 in that capacity. West Indies Archbishop John Holder has been elected by his colleagues to succeed her and represent the Americas and the Caribbean. In addition to Anis, Archbishops Richard Clarke from Ireland, Philip Freier of Australia and Thabo Makgoba of Southern Africa are the other primatial members.Thus, Presiding Bishop Curry is not at the meeting because he is not one of the church’s three ACC members, nor is he on the Standing Committee.At this meeting, a few primates, such as Deng and Hong Kong Archbishop Paul Kwong are attending as provincial ACC members.– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Tags Jeff Lovell says: David Allen says: Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York ACC16, Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Collierville, TN susan zimmerman says: Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Rector Columbus, GA April 10, 2016 at 3:08 pm I think this pretty much sums it all up: “Welby noted in his report to the ACC that the primates have “no legal authority over provinces” and that no one Instrument of Communion can make another instrument do or not do something.” And, since when are the regional archbishops (Presiding Bishops) called “primates?” What a terrible, inappropriate title for a servant leader of the worldwide Anglican Church! It’s time to stop pretending to be what we are not. Submit an Event Listing Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Albany, NY Brian K. Tench says: Anglican Consultative Council, Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Comments are closed. Rector Belleville, IL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Primates Meeting 2016 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Primates Meeting, An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA susan zimmerman says: Rector Washington, DC Rector Shreveport, LA Press Release Service Submit a Press Release Featured Events J. Coder says: The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Cynthia Katsarelis says: Rector Smithfield, NC Anglican Consultative Council begins with discussion of ‘consequences’ Episcopal Church’s three members present for 16th ACC gathering in Africa Featured Jobs & Calls Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel April 9, 2016 at 1:09 pm Once you delete the American Wordphobics they will not care…they are/will delete all homophobics…your actions will allow the Wordphobics to dump the Scripture (and they cant wait!) …why dont we follow the Protestant way and remember that each person is responsible for their ‘own’ sins…try to embrace/respect (not tolerate) all people…The Catholic side of the faith must remember that we’re responsible as individuals…within the community…in PECUSA the individual is primary… This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 April 8, 2016 at 4:16 pm I find the effort by Elizabeth Pavers, as reported, to be as clear as mud. Surely there’s no one in the room who doesn’t want every part of the communion to flourish. The issue is whether “flourishing” means respecting difference or allowing any group to exercise power over another province. It doesn’t help that she showed her bias, calling the primates our spiritual leaders and noting they’ve made a request. In TEC, we elect our spiritual leader. We don’t elect the ABC or the primates of other provinces, so it is not correct to collectively call all the primates our spiritual leaders. This is yet another example of overreach and does not build trust or confidence for walking together with difference. The Anglican Covenant failed, it appears that the ABC and Ms. Paver are not living in that reality. It’s frustrating. There is a lot of pain in this world, and a lot of work to do to heal it. Could we not get the English to stop acting colonial, stop trying to force a square peg into a round hole, and get on with the Jesus Movement? Acts of love, kindness, healing, justice, and peace don’t have to stop while the ACC figures out that TEC is not going backwards on love, kindness, healing, and justice for LGBTQI people. Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Youth Minister Lorton, VA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA April 11, 2016 at 6:19 pm I concur with Jeff Lovell. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Director of Music Morristown, NJ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Bath, NC April 9, 2016 at 12:35 pm I came away with a different take on Ms Pavers weak attempt. I think that this was a typical softly, softly approach used by many English so as not to upset anyone, that, and their bassackwards approach to asking questions and explaining things. I think it went over like a lead balloon perhaps because most folks were as confused by her statement & question as we are. Submit a Job Listing Rector Pittsburgh, PA April 9, 2016 at 11:44 am Any discussion of “consequences” for the Episcopal Church for embracing its gay and lesbian brothers and sisters is absurd. The Episcopal Church should consider voluntarily withdrawing from the communion, perhaps under a resolution for guidance on separation of same sex couples, until the communion, as a whole, comes to its senses. By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Apr 8, 2016 April 10, 2016 at 1:51 pm It’s been quite a long time since I read something from the ENS.My congratulations to Ms. Schjonberg on writing a piece that achieves equanimity to a much greater extent than was the tendency years ago. It’s possible even for the ENS to write reliable news stories, and I am glad that this one is so much better than before. Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Anglican Communion, Rev. Dr. John T. Sorensen says: Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Tampa, FL Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Curate Diocese of Nebraska April 9, 2016 at 1:19 pm I agree regarding this absurdity..ethicists do not rank the ethics of consequential-ism or ethics as responsibility very high on their lists (mainly for uneducated middle and lower classes)Consider ‘ethics’ as eschatology, which is a system to base all ‘moral’ actions Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR April 9, 2016 at 1:41 pm ,…re the Jesus Movement…Jesus is in Heaven!…we’re in the time of the Holy Spirit (She)!…Jewish Jesus didn’t resend himself..rather he resent רוה the Spirit they had been waiting on since ‘their’ breaking of ‘their’ covenant!last_img read more

Una congregación camboyana contribuyó a iniciar la agricultura comunitaria de…

first_img An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Por Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Aug 19, 2016 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Una congregación camboyana contribuyó a iniciar la agricultura comunitaria de la Iglesia Huertos comunitarios hermanan a diversos barrios en Tacoma Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit a Press Release Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Smithfield, NC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Submit a Job Listing Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Albany, NY Submit an Event Listing Curate Diocese of Nebraska New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Martinsville, VA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Belleville, IL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Director of Music Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Tampa, FL Church-Community Agriculture Press Release Service AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Cathedral Dean Boise, ID In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Youth Minister Lorton, VA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Washington, DC Featured Jobs & Calls Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Nota de la redacción: Este es el artículo más reciente de una serie continua sobre congregaciones de la Iglesia Episcopal que participan en la agricultura comunitaria. Otros artículos de la serie se pueden encontrar aquí.Sue Bernstein, miembro de la iglesia episcopal camboyana de la Sagrada Familia de Jesús en Tacoma, Washington, y promotora de los huertos comunitarios, habla con Saron Chin, a la izquierda y Soeung Long, en el huerto que está detrás de la iglesia. Foto de Mary Frances Schjonberg/ENS[Episcopal News Service – Tacoma Washington] La agricultura comunitaria puede estar empezando a arraigarse en algunas partes de la Iglesia Episcopal, pero cuando la iglesia episcopal camboyana de la Sagrada Familia de Jesús [Holy Family of Jesus Cambodian Episcopal Church] plantó un huerto hace 20 años fueron pioneros del movimiento.Los huertos y la iglesia han crecido juntos desde que la Sagrada Familia se fundara en 1990. Desde los primeros años, a mediados de la década del 90, hasta el día de hoy, las parcelas individuales han sido como un bálsamo en [la zona de] Gilead para los refugiados camboyanos que huyeron del terror y la muerte que les acechaba en su país a fines de los años setenta y principios de los ochenta. Esos refugiados sobrevivieron en los campos de reasentamiento en Tailandia antes de llegar a Estados Unidos, donde muy pocas personas entre las que ellos vivían hablaban su idioma.Algunos camboyanos vinieron a EE.UU. después que Phnom Penh, la capital de Camboya, cayó en manos de los comunistas del [movimiento] Khmer Rouge en 1975, pero la gran oleada se produjo después de que el Khmer Rouge fue derrocado en 1979. Cerca de 150.000 refugiados camboyanos ingresaron en Estados Unidos después de la guerra en Indochina, pero la mayoría llegó entre los años 1980 y 1985.Al principio fueron patrocinados por agrupaciones religiosas y agencias de voluntarios que los esparcieron por todo el país. Cuando pasó el tiempo y el patrocinio se terminó, los refugiados comenzaron a mudarse a las áreas donde sabían que ya otros se habían establecido. La de Seattle/Tacoma fue una de ellas.“Venir aquí donde todo es tan diferente y sentirte emocionalmente exhausto y tener la oportunidad de poner las manos en el suelo” y reconectarte con tus recuerdos de la agricultura en Camboya, han hecho de estos huertos, que comenzaron en 1996, “un lugar de fundacional, un lugar de paz” dijo Sue Bernstein, miembro de la Sagrada Familia durante más de 30 años.La idea de un huerto comunitario se aviene exactamente al concepto original —y permanente— de la Sagrada Familia de ser tanto un lugar de culto como un sitio para la comunidad circunvecina. La iglesia tiene sus raíces en la iglesia episcopal de San Mateo [St. Matthew’s Episcopal Church] en la zona de Brown’s Point en Tacoma. En octubre de 1980, la parroquia patrocinó a una familia camboyana, que comenzó a asistir a la iglesia y algunos otros camboyanos la siguieron.Con el tiempo, los camboyanos sintieron la necesidad de contar con un lugar propio y, debido al área en que la mayoría de ellos vivía, comenzaron a buscar en el barrio de Salishan. El entonces obispo jubilado de Alaska David Cochran, que era el vicario de la congregación, se puso en contacto con algunas fundaciones y con otras iglesias en busca de ayuda económica. Finalmente, la Diócesis de Olympia compró el terreno y, en mayo de 1990, la congregación dedicó el edificio.Por ese tiempo, la Secretaría de Vivienda de Tacoma recibió una subvención federal para combatir una epidemia creciente de delitos y drogas en la urbanización de Salishan, la cual es uno de los proyectos de viviendas más grandes de la costa occidental [de EE.UU.]. El programa comenzó a funcionar, las personas sentían que era más seguro salir a la calle y encontrarse con sus vecinos, y la Sagrada Familia estaba allí esperando para darles la bienvenida.La congregación también preparó al Rdo. Sam Lee, que en 1999 se convirtió en el primer sacerdote camboyano de la Comunión Anglicana.Tallos de frijoles ascienden por el andamiaje de ramas levantadas en una parcela de los huertos comunitarios de la iglesia episcopal de la Sagrada Familia de Jesús en Tacoma, Washington. Foto de Mary Frances Schjonberg/ENSLos que laboran en el terreno que se extiende detrás del estacionamiento de la Sagrada Familia han llegado a convertirse en una gran familia. Algunos, pero no todos, son miembros de la congregación. A lo largo de los años, los camboyanos han labrado la tierra allí junto con vietnamitas, laosianos, samoanos y rusos. Para todos ellos, y especialmente para los hortelanos camboyanos más viejos, la oportunidad de plantar algo de su propia dieta ha sido un medio pacífico de “conectarse con las cosas positivas de cuando eran agricultores en Camboya”, incluidos los aspectos comunales de cultivar y compartir los productos los unos con los otros, según Bernstein.Sarom Chin y Soeung Long han tenido lotes de terreno durante los últimos tres años. Ayudaron a desmontar una maraña de arbustos de moras y expandieron el área de plantación. Ellos mejoran continuamente los plantíos.Soeung Long es miembro de la Sagrada Familia y a veces toca instrumentos durante el culto. Dijo que viene a trabajar en este terreno porque se enorgullece de cómo se ve y que le gusta cultivar alimentos para él y para los demás.Sarom Chin, que no es miembro de la Sagrada Familia, trabaja de voluntario en la despensa de la congregación para personas de la tercera edad y ambos hombres comparten algunos de los alimentos que cultivan con los ancianos que vienen a la Sagrada Familia cada semana para una comida comunitaria. La Asociación de Mujeres Coreanas de la localidad les ofrece comidas a ancianos camboyanos dos días a la semana y a ancianos vietnamitas otros dos días.Los dos hombres dijeron que el tiempo que dedican a los huertos incluyen relatos amenos contados por buenos amigos. Han levantado una plataforma por encima del suelo en torno a un árbol corpulento al fondo de los huertos, que sirve de punto de reunión y como área de almacenaje de los implementos agrícolas. Cerca hay un área donde los hombres ofrecen, en el otoño, unas mazorcas (de maíz) asadas que se han hecho muy populares.“Muchísima gente viene aquí a comer”, recalcó Sarom Chin.Los huertos de la iglesia episcopal camboyana de la Sagrada Familia de Jesús se encuentran detrás del edificio y del estacionamiento de la iglesia en Tacoma, Washington. Foto de Google MapsLas únicas criaturas con que los hombres no se sienten muy felices de compartir comida son los venados. “Se lo comen todo”, afirmó él.La Sagrada Familia se asienta en un barrio arenoso y relativamente pobre de East Tacoma. Partes del barrio están técnicamente en la reserva de los indios puyallup, una de las reservas indias más urbanas de Estados Unidos. El proyecto de viviendas de Salishan debe su nombre a la familia de lenguas que hablaban los pueblos indígenas de la costa noroccidental [de EE.UU.].Bernstein dirigió un estudio bíblico en la urbanización de Salishan y conoció a algunas de las familias camboyanas cuando llegaron por primera vez a Estados Unidos. Fue a través de sus conexiones con esas familias que llegó a comprometerse con la Sagrada Familia.Ella ha estado participando del programa de horticultura comunitario desde la primera vez que se cultivó el terreno detrás de la Sagrada Familia y ayudó a crear un huerto comunitario en Salishan. La idea de los huertos comunitarios camboyanos parte también de un proyecto que comenzó en la escuela primaria del barrio, donde los maestros y otras personas creyeron que un huerto podría ayudar a mostrarles a los jóvenes que a sus mayores, que parecían adaptarse lentamente al modo de vida en Estados Unidos, tenían conocimientos y habilidades que valía la pena respetar y aprender, dijo Bernstein.Con el transcurso de los años, ella ha ayudado a relacionar los huertos de la Sagrada Familia con la comunidad en general. En los años 90, Bernstein trabajaba con el Club Eastside 4-H, que fundó la Eastside 4-H Honey Co. y Youth Fresh Herbs and Flowers. Este último atendía parte del terreno que se extendía entre el estacionamiento de la iglesia y lo que era entonces una plantación de frutales abandonada. El proyecto comenzó en los primeros años de explotación de los huertos y los miembros de la 4-H ayudaron a ampliar el sitio al hacerlo más apto y productivo para la horticultura, explicó.Bernstein ve la horticultura comunitaria como un enfoque holístico de la labor social de la iglesia. Los hortelanos ahorran dinero al cultivar algunos de sus propios alimentos, añadió ella, y comen productos saludables.Esos huertos comunitarios de la iglesia también pueden ser evangelistas. Bernstein dijo que reunir a las personas en un sitio de producción de alimentos, como es un huerto, puede ser un primer paso “para acercarlos al Señor”.– La Rda. Mary Frances Schjonberg es redactora y reportera de Episcopal News Service. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Bath, NC Tags Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Collierville, TN Featured Events Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Hopkinsville, KY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET last_img read more

Anglican Communion secretary general discusses Indonesian religious liberty

first_img Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Tags Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Albany, NY Curate Diocese of Nebraska Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Bath, NC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Smithfield, NC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Knoxville, TN The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit a Press Release Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit an Event Listing Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Collierville, TN Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Washington, DC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Anglican Communion secretary general discusses Indonesian religious liberty Director of Music Morristown, NJ Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Featured Events In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Anglican Communion Rector Tampa, FL Press Release Service Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Submit a Job Listing Rector Belleville, IL [Anglican Communion News Service] The secretary general of the Anglican Communion, Josiah Idowu-Fearon, has raised the issue of religious freedom during discussions with officials from the Indonesian government. Idowu-Fearon met professor Din Syamsuddin, the special envoy for Interfaith & Inter-civilization Dialogue & Cooperation for Indonesian President Joko Widodo, and diplomats from Indonesia’s London embassy, for talks at Lambeth Palace this week. They discussed a range of topics, from freedoms for Christians in Indonesia, to the nature of the Anglican Communion.Read the entire article here. Rector Shreveport, LA Posted Dec 19, 2017 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Martinsville, VA Youth Minister Lorton, VA last_img read more

Pandemic to reshape how congregations worship as dioceses prepare to…

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 The Rev. Angela Cortiñas is seen in a Facebook video of a recent online service at St. Thomas Episcopal Church in College Station, Texas. Photo: Angela Cortiñas[Episcopal News Service] Get ready. The pandemic could change everything that Episcopalians once took for granted about attending church.A reservation could be required to worship in person. Services might not even take place in the church, if the parish hall or an outdoor area can better accommodate social distancing. “No” to handshakes at the peace. “Yes” to wearing masks. Singing is a conflicted “maybe.” Communion – if offered at all – could be received as wafers dropped from above into cupped hands, with hand sanitizer always close by. And don’t expect coffee at coffee hour.Another option: Keep watching the livestream at home and continue to forego attending church in person, while the deadly coronavirus is still spreading.With more than 20,000 new coronavirus cases daily and around 1,000 deaths from COVID-19 each day in the United States, Episcopal dioceses are proceeding cautiously, even in states that have eased their stay-at-home orders to restart their economies. At the same time, church leaders have begun discussing and planning for the day they reopen, with tight limits on attendance. In some dioceses, churches can resume some form of in-person worship as soon as this month.“Government officials have different standards than we do. Their metrics are keeping the health care system from getting overwhelmed and keeping the economy going,” the Rev. Alex Dyer, canon to the ordinary for the Episcopal Church in Colorado, told Episcopal News Service.In Colorado, one of the states partially reopening, the diocese won’t resume any in-person services until certain public health criteria are met, such as a sustained reduction in COVID-19 cases, sufficient capacity in the health care system to test and treat all patients, and the ability to track patients’ contacts. Church leaders there, as elsewhere, say their caution is partly fueled by demographics: Older Americans are more vulnerable to severe coronavirus symptoms, and more than a third of all Episcopalians are 65 or older, according to the Pew Research Center’s most recent Religious Landscape Study.“Our standards are different,” Dyer told ENS. His diocese’s actions are based in love, not fear, he said, and following that Christian framework, “the number of acceptable deaths as a result of our actions is zero.”Most Episcopal congregations across the United States haven’t gathered publicly in their churches since mid-March, when governors and health officials began urging residents to stay mostly at home and to take other precautions, such as social distancing and wearing face masks in public. Such efforts were meant to help slow the spread of COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus.Many congregations now only come together online, but that hasn’t meant a loss of liturgy. At St. Thomas Episcopal Church in College Station, Texas, the schedule actually has expanded during the pandemic: Every weekday morning, Morning Prayer. Every weekday evening, a brief Compline. Every Sunday morning, the Liturgy of the Word, sometimes followed by Communion.What parishioners have lost isn’t the liturgy but rather the experience of worshipping side by side in the pews. They miss each other’s physical presence, said the Rev. Angela Cortiñas, rector of St. Thomas, but they know it’s best to wait. “The majority of them, as much as they long to get back together, they understand the seriousness of what’s going on,” she told ENS in a phone interview.St. Thomas Episcopal Church in College Station, Texas, has offered live worship services every Sunday through Zoom, though on special occasions, such as Easter Sunday, it has recorded a service in the church and hosted a watch party on Facebook. Photo: Angela CortiñasCortiñas understands as well. She is a survivor. After returning from a group trip to Scotland on March 14, she fell ill and tested positive for COVID-19. “It hit me pretty hard,” she said. “I was down and out for almost two weeks with all the symptoms, but another two weeks before I felt normal again.”She has fully recovered, but the experience shapes her thinking about how St. Thomas will resume in-person worship. “It makes me even more cautious because I got it,” she said.In two months, more than 1.3 million Americans are reported to have contracted the virus, and nearly 80,000 have died. The country’s early surge in overall coronavirus cases has plateaued, according to The New York Times database, but local outbreaks continue to raise alarm with the virus likely to remain a threat into 2021, or at least until an effective vaccine is developed and disseminated.“The hard truth is that we will not be able to welcome all people into our places of worship for the foreseeable future,” the bishops of Maryland, Virginia and Washington said in a joint statement released May 4. Instead, they and other bishops around the country are urging their congregations to think now about what it would look like, possibly in the near future, to hold smaller in-person services during the pandemic.More and more state governments – some under pressure by citizens – have begun to resume some social and economic activities in recent weeks, and those developments have provided the backdrop for the cascade of documents issued by dioceses to provide guidance for gradually reopening churches. The bishops’ terminology for the “phases” of reopening includes a range of variations. The Episcopal Church in Colorado describes its phases as “seasons.” The Diocese of Dallas seeks to progress from Step A to Step B. Kansas Bishop Cathleen Bascom invoked John 14:2 as she envisioned the “dwelling places” that congregations will move through as they reopen.All guidance, however, comes with the caveat that plans are subject to change, especially as coronavirus outbreaks flare up, so with every step forward, bishops caution, prepare to take a step backward.“If the coronavirus resurges, we may again have to shelter-in-place,” Bascom said in her May 2 letter to the diocese.Dallas Bishop George Sumner’s guidance allows congregations to move to Step B – gatherings of up to 10 people – by May 17 except in Dallas, Denton and Collin counties, where higher numbers of coronavirus cases have been reported. Bascom said churches in her diocese, which encompasses the eastern half of Kansas, may resume in-person worship on May 24.The Diocese of Texas has asked congregations that wish to resume some form of in-person worship to develop and submit plans to their regional bishop for approval. A case-by-case approach is being considered in the Diocese of Oklahoma as well.“It’s not a one-size-fits-all,” Oklahoma Bishop Ed Konieczny told ENS. Some rural congregations in Oklahoma are just 10 people, all of whom may be family members, he said, while several of the diocese’s largest congregations top 1,000 members.Oklahoma Gov. Kevin Stitt allowed churches to reopen starting May 1, but doing so safely is a challenge for Episcopal congregations. “Inherently, as a Eucharistic body, we have physical contact, whether it’s through exchange of the peace or distribution of Communion,” Konieczny said.The challenge of reopening is evident in the guidelines being issued by dioceses and in the deliberations underway by their congregations, starting with distancing requirements. To ensure individual worshippers or family groups sit at least 6 feet apart, church leaders will need to mark their worship spaces.“You must figure this out in advance by measuring your church space with tape measure in hand before taking this step,” Sumner said in his message.Worshippers likely will be asked to wear masks to lessen the risk of transmitting infection. The Diocese of Maine’s guidelines recommend providing masks, as needed, to people when they arrive. The traditional Sunday morning greeting won’t be the same as before either.“Worship leaders cannot greet people at the back of the nave with hand-shaking and hugging,” according to Maine’s guidelines. “Consider what this means and how connections can still occur.”Passing offertory plates is another practice that may disappear during the pandemic. The Diocese of Maine suggests finding an alternative that minimizes contact, such as a central basket where offerings can be dropped.“The world around us has changed. We are changed. If we think of the next couple months as simply resuming what we did earlier this year, we will be disappointed. God calls us to give thanks for what was and to move forward in trust and gentleness,” Maine Bishop Thomas Brown said. He has asked his diocese to spend May planning, and if conditions allow, churches could begin to reopen in June or July.Church leaders also are rethinking their bulletins and how they are distributed. For example, printing a comprehensive bulletin could allow congregations to remove prayer books and hymnals from the pews during the pandemic.The threat from the coronavirus initially could prevent choirs from returning as well, and churches may need to advise worshippers not to sing along with the hymns, due to concerns that singing could spread the virus farther than 6 feet. Cortiñas, the Texas rector, may limit music to one or two strong singers, without the congregation’s participation.Some dioceses are asking congregations to develop plans for recording the names of people who attend church, for use in contact tracing if a worshipper becomes sick with COVID-19. Church leaders also must clean and sanitize facilities after services.Good Shepherd Episcopal Church in Wichita, Kansas, is considering resuming in-person worship in its fellowship hall rather than the church because it would be easier there to arrange plastic chairs 6 feet apart and clean them afterward. The Rev. Andrew O’Connor, rector at Good Shepherd, told ENS that a socially distanced setup in the hall might allow 30 to 50 people to attend services – much fewer than the 150 or more who typically attended before the pandemic.The congregation understands that in-person inevitably will look and feel different, O’Connor said. “People want us to make sure that we are doing this in a safe and a proper and appropriate kind of way.”The proper way likely will involve some sort of sign-up system. Worshippers will have to reserve one of the dozens of seats during service. That raises the possibility that people could be turned away on a Sunday if the service reaches capacity, O’Connor said, “but how do you manage that conversation?”Cortiñas isn’t sure when St. Thomas will resume in-person worship, but when it does, she thinks the congregation will limit attendance to 20 people at first. As she and the St. Thomas vestry evaluate and adjust their approach, they could gradually expand to about 50. And like O’Connor, Cortiñas expects to implement a sort of reservation system for attendance.What won’t change is the availability of St. Thomas’ online worship. The church’s plan may involve two services, a scaled-down in-person service that will be livestreamed on Facebook and a second service on Zoom, so the rest of the congregation can participate. Other dioceses and congregations around The Episcopal Church have continued to stress the need for online options during the pandemic because not all Episcopalians will feel comfortable attending church in person.“Virtual worship will still be necessary in all congregations to accommodate vulnerable populations and larger worshipping communities,” Maryland Bishop Eugene Sutton, Virginia Bishop Suffragan Susan Goff and Washington Bishop Mariann Budde said in their recent guidance on reopening.Kansas priests may decide it simply isn’t safe for them to reopen at this time. “No church is required to resume worship in their building, and I will support whatever a church decides is in the best interest of its members,” Bascom said.In some dioceses hit hard by COVID-19, resuming in-person worship is still far in the future. In the New York area, seen as the epicenter of the virus’ spread in the United States, the dioceses of New York and Long Island issued parallel statements May 1 announcing that gradual resumption of public gatherings wouldn’t begin earlier than July 1, though local leaders are discussing how they eventually will handle the return to their churches.“The science and medicine are clear, and our first and most serious consideration must be the safety of the most vulnerable around us,” the Diocese of Long Island statement said.The Diocese of Los Angeles, too, faces uncertainty about when it will be ready to gather in person again. Bishop John Harvey Taylor said in a May 4 newsletter that he and the heads of the diocese’s 10 deaneries are deliberating on that question, following the lead of state policymakers.When churches reopen, Communion will be “our biggest challenge,” Taylor said.“We don’t want people to fear the sacrament or their neighbor,” he said. “No single subject is receiving more attention throughout The Episcopal Church. … Since some opportunity to be together again for worship is likely to precede clarity and confidence about serving the physical elements in a safe and theologically sound way, we will give consideration to using Daily Office liturgies at first,” Taylor told the Diocese of Los Angeles.Other dioceses are making a point to “fast” from Communion at this time. In dioceses where the full Holy Eucharist continues to be celebrated, guidelines typically specify that only the bread will be offered and Eucharistic ministers must sanitize their hands before and after distributing Communion.In Wisconsin, Fond du Lac Bishop Matthew Gunter issued a statement April 29 saying in-person worship was not resuming, but he offered guidelines for ways congregations could celebrate Holy Eucharist “with a small community gathering in-person to represent the congregation as a whole.” Gunter advised congregations to limit these services to three or four people, and each congregation must fill out a form to receive prior approval.An “isolation group” of clergy and lay leaders livestream a Sunday worship service from Holy Innocents’ Episcopal Church in Valrico, Florida. Photo: Bryan O’CarrollFollowing that model, some churches already are experimenting with in-person worship. In the Diocese of Southwest Florida, Bishop Dabney Smith never fully suspended in-person worship but told his congregations they must limit gatherings to 10 or fewer.Just east of Tampa at Holy Innocents’ Episcopal Church in Valrico, the Rev. Bryan O’Carroll, the church’s rector, has led an “isolation group” of six church members who have committed to limiting their personal contact only to each other so they can gather every Sunday in the church to livestream services on Facebook, including Communion.O’Carroll told ENS he hasn’t yet faced pressure from his congregation to expand those services to allow a larger group of worshippers to gather in person on Sunday.Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis began reopening the state on May 4, allowing the public back into some businesses with reduced capacity. “I see that society around us has a much bigger urgency for this return,” O’Carroll said, while parishioners at his church aren’t in such a hurry. “They’re much more cautious than that.”– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Smithfield, NC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL By David PaulsenPosted May 11, 2020 Pandemic to reshape how congregations worship as dioceses prepare to resume in-person gatherings Liturgy & Music Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Belleville, IL Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Submit an Event Listing Rector Hopkinsville, KY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Albany, NY The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Featured Events Submit a Job Listing Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Press Release Service Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC COVID-19, Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Tampa, FL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Washington, DC Rector Collierville, TN Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Pittsburgh, PA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Health & Healthcare, Rector Knoxville, TN Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Bath, NC Tags Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC last_img read more