2020 Honda Civic hatchback gets a meaner face and more sweet sixspeed

first_imgEnlarge ImageThe 2020 Civic hatchback in Sport Touring trim looks a little meaner and can be had with a six-speed manual. Honda The present generation of Honda Civic is better than it’s been in a really long time. So when Honda announced on Thursday that it was tweaking the hatchback version for 2020, we were psyched.The changes to the Civic hatch aren’t massive, but that’s no bad thing because the car was already good. The most significant change — and the one that’s going to get enthusiasts’ hearts pumping the most — is the addition of a six-speed manual transmission in the top Sport Touring trim level. If you know Honda, then you know that gearbox is going to be good.In addition to the six-speed manual, Honda is offering a CVT transmission, and with that choice, you get remote start. The Sport trim level also gets push-button ignition and keyless entry as standard.2020-honda-civic-hatchback-sport-touring-056Enlarge ImageThe interior of the 2020 Civic hatchback sports an updated infotainment system and typical Honda practicality. Honda Next, the big H made some slight adjustments to the vehicle’s styling; specifically, it gave the hatchback a more aggressive look in the front and rear. Now, it’s definitely not Civic Type R levels of aggression, but it suits the car quite well.Inside, Honda is using the dashboard trim to help differentiate between trim levels. For example, top-spec EX-L and Sport Touring get a brushed black finish while the Sport trim gets a geometric pattern. Also on deck is an upgraded Display Audio system which still offers physical controls and both Android Auto and Apple CarPlay integration.Pricing for the 2020 Civic hatchback ranges from $21,580 for the base LX model with the CVT transmission and $22,750 for the Sport trim with manual transmission to $29,780 for the Sport Touring model with CVT, and all are set to go on sale on Friday. 2019 Honda Civic Sedan: Small visual updates and friendlier tech More From Roadshow 2020 Mini JCW Clubman first drive: A fast alternative for the crossover-averse Preview • Apple CarPlay lets iOS take over a Mercedes-Benz Honda Tags 2 Share your voice News • 2018 Toyota Camry and Sienna eligible for Apple CarPlay, Amazon Alexa retrofit Hatchbacks Car Industry Honda 2020 Toyota 4Runner first drive: Same as it ever was — mostly 2020 Kia Soul review: Well-rounded box More about Apple CarPlay Comments Honda Civic Type R TCR is one serious $172,000 race car 4:41 Review • Apple CarPlay review: What’s it like after one month of heavy use? Now playing: Watch this: 63 Photoslast_img read more

Stranded Rohingya refuse to return to Myanmar without citizenship guarantee

Stranded Rohingya refuse to return to Myanmar without citizenship guarantee

first_imgA man walks past the entrance of a camp set up by Myanmar`s Social Welfare, Relief and Resettlement Minister to prepare for the repatriation of displaced Rohingyas, who fled to Bangladesh, outside Maungdaw in the state of Rakhine. Photo: ReutersRohingya refugees living in no man’s land refused Tuesday to return to Myanmar without guarantees of citizenship and security after Bangladesh and Myanmar officials met to discuss their repatriation.The 6,000 Rohingya were among the first to flee Myanmar in the wake of a brutal military crackdown on the Muslim minority in late August. They have been living ever since in a makeshift camp in a strip of unclaimed land between the two countries.In recent weeks they have come under pressure to return, with a Myanmar minister warning of “consequences” if they remain in no man’s land.But community leader Dil Mohammad told AFP they would not return without guarantees of security, citizenship and compensation for property lost in the clampdown.“We are not going to return to our homes and villages in Myanmar unless our demands are met. We want citizenship, all rights, security to our lives and property and compensation,” he said.Mainly Buddhist Myanmar denies citizenship to its Muslim Rohingya minority in Rakhine state, insisting they are illegal immigrants from Bangladesh even though many have been there for generations.Nearly 700,000 fled after last year’s crackdown, which the United Nations has said amounted to ethnic cleansing.Most of those now live in camps across the border in Bangladesh, but the country’s government has made clear it does not want them to stay and has agreed to start sending them home.On Tuesday officials from both countries held talks to decide the fate of the 6,000 before speaking to them directly in no man’s land.“Every person we spoke to said that they would go back to their homes if they got security,” said the head of the Bangladesh delegation, Abdul Mannan.A spokeswoman for the UN refugee agency told AFP any returns must be voluntary.“Some members of this group in no man’s land have said they fear returning home and wish to seek safety in Bangladesh,” Caroline Gluck said.“We appeal to the Bangladeshi authorities to allow them to do so. At the same time, Myanmar should ensure conducive conditions for the safe and sustainable return of those who wish to do so voluntarily.”A video circulated on social media last week showed Myanmar’s deputy minister for home affairs Aung Soe addressing the refugees through a barbed-wire fence.Other Rohingya living there said the Myanmar army had recently set up bunkers near the fence and now conducted regular patrols nearby, stirring fear among the refugees.“They tell us that we should leave this place or else they will shoot us,” said Rashid Ahmed, 32.Bangladesh was supposed to start the repatriation process last month but it has been delayed amid concerns over a lack of preparation.Recent aerial photos of Rakhine state showed bulldozed Rohingya settlements, and it is unclear whether they will be able to return to their former homes.last_img
PM Hasina thinks democracy now wellprotected

PM Hasina thinks democracy now wellprotected

first_imgSheikh HasinaPrime minister Sheikh Hasina on Saturday said Bangladesh’s democracy is now well-protected and it has earned the capability to face any disaster.“Our economy has stood on a solid ground and democracy is well-protected … we’ve been able to ensure fundamental rights of the people like food, clothes, housing and education,” she said.The prime minister made the comments before media after exchanging Eid greetings with the cross section of people, including party leaders and workers, professionals, judges and foreign diplomats at her official Ganabhaban residence here this afternoon.Sheikh Hasina said Bangladesh is now economically developed and the people’s purchasing capacity has increased and their living standard has improved significantly.She said the literacy rate and the people’s average life expectancy have gone up and Bangladesh got recognition as a developing country thanks to various steps of her government.Putting emphasis on maintaining the continuation of the development, the premier said the country had to cross many hurdles to earn this success.“We’ve to also cross many barriers in future to advance the country and it’s natural … we keep capability to face any disaster,” she added.The prime minister reiterated her determination to build a hunger and poverty-free country by 2021 and developed and prosperous country in South Asia by 2041.“The people of the country will also celebrate the birth centenary of Bangabandhu in 2020 by establishing Bangladesh as a hunger and poverty-free country,” she said.“We want that we could move on the world stage by keeping our head high and we’re building the country in this way and Insha Allah the country will advance in that way,” she added.At the outset of her speech, Sheikh Hasina greeted the countrymen and expatriate Bangladeshis on the occasion of holy Eid-ul-Fitr. “I want that the people will live in joyous environment throughout their life and it’s my wish that they will live beautifully,” she said.She also paid rich tributes to Bangabandhu, four national leaders, three million martyrs and two lakh mothers and sisters who sacrificed their life for the cause of the country.The gate of the Ganabhaban was opened for visitors at 9.30am when people from all walks of life started coming after their Eid prayers and waited in a long queue to meet the prime minister. On the occasion the big lawn of Gonabhaban was tastefully decorated.Leaders of different political parties, parliament members, freedom fighters, educationists, senior journalists, leaders of associate bodies of Awami League and different professional and trade bodies as well as the cross section of people including beggars and destitute exchanged Eid greetings with the prime minister.Agriculture minister Begum Matia Chowdhury, LGRD minister Engineer Khandakar Mosharraf Hossain, AL presidium members Sheikh Fazlul Karim Selim, Muhammad Faruk KhanDr Abdur Razzak and Sahara Khatun, central leaders Mozaffar Hossain Paltu, Jahangir Kabir Nanak, Ashim Kumar Ukil, Khalid Mahmud Chowdhury and Dhaka South City Corporation mayor Sayeed Khokan were present, among others.Like previous years, some of the visitors took the programme as an opportunity to draw attention of the top executive of the country to their woes and sufferings and sought her intervention and support to resolve those problems.Later, Sheikh Hasina exchanged Eid greetings with judges of the Supreme Court, senior civil and military officials and ambassadors and high commissioners of different friendly countries at a separate programme on Ganabhaban lawn.Jatiya Sangsad speaker Shirin Sharmin Choudhury, chief justice Syed Mahmud Hossain and the chiefs of the three services attended the function.last_img read more

Saudi launches green card systems for expats

Saudi launches green card systems for expats

first_imgIn this file photo taken on 27 November 2018 Saudi Arabia`s Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman is pictured while meeting with the Tunisian President at the presidential palace in Carthage on the eastern outskirts of the capital Tunis. Photo: AFPSaudi Arabia launched on Sunday their new special residency scheme similar to green card systems applicable in other countries, aimed at attracting wealthy and high-skilled expats.The residency scheme offers two types of residencies, a permanent one for 800,000 Saudi riyals ($213,321.96) and a one year but renewable residency for 100,000 Saudi riyals ($26,665.24).The scheme was approved by the Saudi cabinet last month, but on Sunday the online portal to apply was opened to the public.The residencies would allow foreign expats free movement, ability to own properties and to do business in the kingdom.Currently over 10 million expats work and live in Saudi Arabia under a system that requires them to be sponsored by a Saudi employer and be issued an exit and re-entry visa whenever they want to leave the country. ($1 = 3.7502 riyals)last_img

One Tool for Managing All Your Business Schedules

first_img 3 min read Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. March 14, 2012 This story appears in the March 2012 issue of . Subscribe » Register Now » Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global The phone calls were driving Ray Chang crazy. His seven-employee company, Motorsport Lab, was hours into its first Groupon deal–a one-hour supercar driving session priced at $89, a whopping 82 percent discount–and the number of calls flooding the Boston office was out of control.”It was mayhem,” recalls Chang, whose company sells driving experiences in exotic cars such as Ferraris and Lamborghinis to New England- and Arizona-area marketing campaigns and events. “We were keeping track of all our appointments in Google Docs. When we sold 1,500 Groupons that first day, I thought, How are we going to make this work?”The answer came from a massage. Chang had booked one several weeks earlier using Genbook, a new cloud-based service that lets small businesses automate their client appointments. Merchants integrate Genbook’s BookNow button into their website, Facebook page or blog; the button links to a customized, real-time reservations page that features the business’s logo, contact information, consumer reviews and related information.With 48 hours remaining on his Groupon offer, Chang migrated the scheduling chores to Genbook. “The phone calls stopped, because 99 percent of the people could figure out everything they needed to know online,” he says. “It revolutionized everything we do. We don’t have to take credit card numbers and answer the same questions over the phone anymore, and customers can book anytime they want.”Motorsport Lab is just one of more than 5,000 North American small businesses implementing the online booking service. “Scheduling is the most critical task a business does day in and day out,” says Genbook founder and CEO Rody Moore, who started the San Francisco-based company in 2007. “Ten years ago, consumers felt put out if they had to book a flight or a restaurant reservation online. Now customers expect an online option.”In its startup incarnation, Genbook offered its platform to digital advertisers to help them manage media schedules across hundreds of websites. But in 2008 the company pivoted to its current, monthly subscription service and expanded its customer base. Chiropractors, massage therapists and other one-person operations made up the bulk of Genbook’s early adopters, but a growing number of larger businesses, such as spas, have since joined the platform. And their customers have embraced the service, too: An average of 500,000 appointments are being scheduled every month.”Scheduling is the most critical task a business does day in and day out.” –Rody Moore, GenbookThe booking service offers packages that cater to outfits of all sizes. Genbook Solo schedules one person’s clients for $19.95 per month; Genbook Standard manages an unlimited number of calendars for $39.95 per month. This year, the company–which has been bankrolled by $5.6 million from Neo Technology Ventures and Moore himself–launched an analytics dashboard to help merchants leverage “the massive amount of data generated through the act of making an appointment or reservation,” Moore says, adding that key metrics include customer preferences among services offered, sales trends and individual employee performance.Back at Motorsport Lab, Genbook has allowed Chang to fully automate the company’s scheduling and, as a result, shed staff and save $50,000 per year.”Genbook makes it so much easier to communicate accurate and up-to-date information about our business to people,” Chang says. “We still get a few calls with questions we can’t answer online, but Genbook handles just about everything else. To me, it’s a no-brainer.” last_img read more