Texana adding IMCA Modifieds to Saturday shows

first_imgEDNA, Texas (Feb. 26) – Interest generated by a Modified race held at Edna last fall led to the IMCA division being sanctioned there this season. IMCA Modifieds join Saturday programs at Texana Raceway Park beginning with opening night on March 30. Another 13 events are scheduled at the 5/16-mile clay oval through season championship night on Sept. 28. Located approximately 100 miles southwest of Houston, Texana Raceway Park will field a strong group of local Modified drivers while getting cars from the San Antonio, Corpus Christi and Houston areas. “This is another great addition to our South Central Region,” noted IMCA Vice President of Operations Jim Stannard, “and a great track for RaceSaver Sprint Car events as well.” Specials on the 2019 schedule are the Aug. 30-31 Jim Scribellito Memorial, held in honor of the former Shady Oaks Speedway promoter, and the Oct. 25-26 Aaron Hudgeons Memorial.  Texana, which was sanctioned in 2005 and 2006, will be part of IMCA’s Razor Chassis South Central Region for Modifieds and will also host a number of IMCA RaceSaver Sprint Car events. “There was a lot of interest. We polled the drivers and it was unanimous that they wanted to go with IMCA,” said promoter Rachel Densman, who purchased the track two years ago with her husband Kenny, a former Modified driver. “IMCA is a well-known organization. We like the rules and we like that our drivers will be eligible for point funds.”last_img read more

Bournemouth return to form with easy win over Norwich

first_img Dan Gosling opened the scoring for the home side with 10 minutes gone before Charlie Daniels converted from the spot shortly after half-time. Benik Afobe, Bournemouth’s record signing, then opened his account for the club following a cool finish with 15 minutes remaining. Daniels, a constant threat down Bournemouth’s left flank, was allowed to drift into the Norwich penalty area and appeared to be grappled to the floor by Russell Martin. The Canaries defender protested his innocence and referee Robert Madley waved away the home side’s appeals. Madley was back in the spotlight moments before the interval when Rudd scythed down Afobe on the edge of his own box. Harry Arter played Afobe through, and in attempting to clear the ball, Rudd took a wild swing with his right foot, before missing the ball and taking the former Wolves and Arsenal striker down with him. The home crowd chanted for a red card, but Rudd, with Sebastien Bassong and Ryan Bennett in close proximity, was shown only a yellow. Moments after the re-start and it was Madley who was once more the focus of the home support after Arter fell in the Norwich penalty area. Madley turned down his appeals and the Cherries midfielder was booked for his protests. Bournemouth, however, remained in the ascendancy and after Pugh’s header was cleared off the line by Martin, Bournemouth were finally awarded a spot-kick. Vadis Odjidja-Ofoe pulled back Pugh, and Madley had no hesitation in pointing to the penalty spot. Daniels stepped up to double Bournemouth’s advantage and it was no less than Howe’s side deserved. Afobe, in only his second appearance for Bournemouth, then completed the victory when he tapped home a fine cross from Daniels. The result takes Howe’s men above Norwich into 15th in the table with the Canaries now one point and one place below them. TWEET OF THE MATCH “Great win, fully deserved. Congrats bro on your first of many @Afobe_” – injured Bournemouth defender Tyrone Mings RATINGS BOURNEMOUTH Artur Boruc 7 Simon Francis 7 Steve Cook 7 Charlie Daniels 9 Dan Gosling 8 Andrew Surman 7 Marc Pugh 7 Harry Arter 8 Adam Smith 7 Junior Stanislas 7 Benik Afobe 8 Subs: Eunan O’Kane 5 Glenn Murray 5 Yann Kermorgant 5 NORWICH Declan Rudd 5 Ryan Bennett 5 Russell Martin 5 Sebastien Bassong 4 Jonny Howson 5 Alex Tettey 5 Wes Hoolahan 5 Matt Jarvis 5 Robbie Brady 5 Vadis Odjidja-Ofoe 4 Dieumerci Mbokani 5 Subs: Cameron Jerome 5 Nathan Redmond 5 Graham Dorrans 5 STAR PLAYER Charlie Daniels – Turned in an impressive display for Bournemouth as he bombed up and down the left flank. He scored from the penalty spot and then assisted Benik Afobe for his first goal for the club with a fine cross. MOMENT OF THE MATCH Norwich manager Alex Neil turning the air blue with an array of expletives after Sebastien Bassong asked for someone to fetch his gloves moments after the kick-off. Neil did not look impressed with Bassong’s request, but the Cameroon defender got his wish. VIEW FROM THE BENCH That was Norwich’s third defeat in as many games and Neil cut a frustrated figure in the away dugout. In contrast, Eddie Howe will be delighted with his side’s response from their second-half horror show against West Ham only five days ago. MOAN OF THE MATCH How was Declan Rudd not sent off for his foul on Afobe? The Norwich goalkeeper scythed down Bournemouth’s new signing with a horror challenge, but was only booked. Not referee Robert Madley’s finest afternoon. NEXT UP Sunderland v Bournemouth (Barclays Premier League, January 23) Norwich v Liverpool (Barclays Premier League, January 23) Both sides made one change from their midweek defeats. Bournemouth midfielder Marc Pugh came in for the injured Matt Ritchie while Gary O’Neill, sent off against Stoke, was replaced by Matt Jarvis. Lewis Grabban had been expected to feature against his former club but the forward, who re-signed for the Cherries in a £7million deal earlier this month, was said to be suffering from an illness. Bournemouth may have suffered a 3-1 home defeat against West Ham on Tuesday night, but there was no sign of any hangover for Howe’s side. Indeed it was the south coast club – on a winless run of four matches heading into Saturday’s fixture – who came flying out of the blocks. Afobe fizzed a 20-yard effort over Declan Rudd’s bar with only two minutes gone, before Junior Stanislas’ deflected shot then fell into the hands of the grateful Norwich goalkeeper. Bournemouth have gained a reputation as fast-starters – having scored six goals inside the opening 15 minutes which is more than any other Premier League club – and with 10 minutes on the clock they increased that tally to seven. Gosling ghosted unmarked into the Norwich area before Marc Pugh’s pinpoint cross was headed home by the former Everton midfielder. It was Gosling’s third league goal of the campaign and no less than the home side deserved for their early endeavour. Gosling’s curling left-footed effort then went narrowly wide of Rudd’s right post before Bournemouth probably should have been given the chance to extend their lead from 12 yards. Bournemouth recorded the biggest win of their short Barclays Premier League tenure after cruising to a 3-0 victory against Norwich. Press Associationlast_img read more

‘I want it to be normal’: 1st ACC broadcast led entirely by women

first_img Published on January 21, 2020 at 11:27 pm Contact Mitchell: mbannon@syr.edu UPDATED: Jan. 23, 2020 at 2:18 p.m.Posing for a photograph near mid-court with her legs crossed and hands on her knee, Beth Mowins yelled through a smile.“You ever think you’d see this day?” Mowins asked Syracuse.com’s Donna Ditota, who sat a few rows up in the empty Carrier Dome stands.“Long time coming,” Ditota responded.Mowins was surrounded by the ACC Network’s broadcast team for SU’s Jan. 16 women’s basketball game against Georgia Tech. Color analyst Isis Young was to her right, producer Mackenzie Pearce to her left. Seventeen other women surrounded the trio, too.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“I remember when it was just me and Sue in the room,” Mowins said to Ditota.The 21 women laughed. But it wasn’t really a joke. The truth is the sports media industry has been dominated by men. Mowins and Sue Edson, Syracuse Athletics’ chief communications officer, were the only women in their 1989 sports broadcasting class at Newhouse, Edson said. A 2015 SAGE journal report found that 95% of analyzed sports-news shows had male anchors. In 2017, Mowins became the first female announcer to call an NFL game since 1987, and the first to ever call a nationally televised game.“I’ve always kind of felt comfortable in situations where you may have been the only woman in the room,” Mowins said. “That’s okay. That’s just kind of the way that I’ve always lived my life.”But last Thursday, that all flipped. For the first time in the ACC Network’s three-year history, a broadcast — from producer to director to pregame, halftime and postgame show — would be led by women in every lead position. It may have been a first, but Olivia Stomski, director of the Newhouse Sports Media Center, hopes one day an all-women’s broadcast wouldn’t be an ordeal at all – no need for press conferences, photo ops and media releases.Roshan Fernandez | Asst. Digital Editor“I want it to be normal that both male and female students are used to having women in these powerful positions and are used to having women call the shots,” Stomski said.• • •With an hour before tipoff, Young and Mowins sat behind their desk at center court. While Young scribbled into a notepad, bouncing to the Carrier Dome’s music — “Dior” by Pop Smoke — Mowins reviewed her pink-and-yellow highlighted cue cards and the Syracuse–Georgia Tech stat sheet.When Edson, producer Kristin Hennessey and senior producer Scott Hecht were discussing the upcoming ACC Network broadcasts in late December, they realized the Jan. 16 broadcast was shaping up to be led by a staff of women. Everyone was doing jobs they’d done before. They simply took the opportunity to “blow it out of the water,” Hennessey said, bringing in Young and Mowins and completing the all-female leading crew.Mowins, the 2015 Marty Glickman Award for Leadership in Sports Media recipient, and Young had met several times before the Georgia Tech game but had never shared a booth. After the 2017 espnW: Women + Sports Summit panel, Young rushed up to Mowins, the first to talk to her, and asked “just about everything,” Young said. Throughout her career, Mowins has embraced the role of mentor for young women trying to get into sports media. She understands the importance of seeing people that look like themselves in leadership roles and positions of power, she said.“I think there are millions of young women out there — Isis is one of them — that have dreams that are way bigger than mine,” Mowins said.With 12 minutes to tipoff, Syracuse Director of Athletics John Wildhack walked across the court, leaned over the desk and monitors and reached out his hand to shake Mowins’.“Thanks for doing this,” Wildhack said.Thanks for calling the game? Mowins had done that before. She’s called NFL, World Cup, college football and college basketball games. Wildhack’s thank you was for more.If somebody’s got to be the one to kind of walk through the door and hold it open andhopefully encourage other people to dream whatever dreams they have, thenthat’s great.- Beth Mowins“If somebody’s got to be the one to kind of walk through the door and hold it open and hopefully encourage other people to dream whatever dreams they have,” Mowins said, “then that’s great.”• • •A few minutes into the second quarter, with the Orange down 18-15, Syracuse’s cheerleading team jogged out to center court during a TV timeout. Hoisted on to each other’s shoulders, they led the crowd in a chant.“Let’s go, Orange!” *CLAP-CLAP-CLAP CLAP CLAP*Under the courtside desk, Mowins clapped along. “Let’s go Orange,” she mouthed under her breath. *CLAP-CLAP-CLAP CLAP CLAP*Both Mowins and Young graduated from Newhouse – Mowins as a graduate student in 1990 and Young, with both an undergraduate and graduate degree, in 2019 after playing basketball for the Orange. Sixteen of the 20 women involved in Thursday’s production went or go to Syracuse, Hennessey said. Because of Newhouse and the Dick Clark Studios, Syracuse is uniquely positioned to produce events like Thursday night’s. It’s the only school in the ACC that regularly uses students as on-air talent and the only school that cuts to a student-run studio for halftime, said Hennessey.“There’s just so much history here,” Mowins said of SU and Newhouse. “It’s really cool to be number one, and to be a part of something that you know is a special place and somewhat of a mecca that other people aspire to be a part of.”At halftime, Mowins and Young kept their headsets on, watching the studio show being shot back at Dick Clark Studios on their monitors. Junior Jenna Fink and senior Nicole Weaving brought in graduate student Michelle Knezovic to present a story on Amaya Finklea-Guity’s love of drawing and painting.In the adjacent control room three SU students, including director Maria Trivelpiece, directed and produced the pregame, halftime and postgame shows.Mitchell Bannon | Asst. Sports EditorWith three minutes remaining in the game and the Orange down 79-63, the postgame show crew returned to their positions.“Walk them through what they’re doing,” Stomski said to the team.Fink and Weaving discussed the Orange’s upcoming schedule from their studio desk while producer Mackenzie Pearce counted down the remaining seconds into their ears: Thirty, then 20, then 10. “I’m going to drop this on you,” a voice from the control room said.As Pearce finished her countdown, a photo of all the women involved in Thursday’s production flashed onto the screen, panning out from Mowins and Young, revealing all 20 women.“When we were sitting at the Dome I said that’s the shot we’re going to end with,” Hennessey said. “I was kind of joking … but I thought it was fitting to end with that.”As the screen closed to black the control room applauded. Everyone started to file out of the room. Maybe not together, but they will do it all again soon.CLARIFICATION: In a previous version of this post, it wasn’t specified that Isis Young completed undergraduate and graduate school at SU. Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more