2020 Honda Civic hatchback gets a meaner face and more sweet sixspeed

first_imgEnlarge ImageThe 2020 Civic hatchback in Sport Touring trim looks a little meaner and can be had with a six-speed manual. Honda The present generation of Honda Civic is better than it’s been in a really long time. So when Honda announced on Thursday that it was tweaking the hatchback version for 2020, we were psyched.The changes to the Civic hatch aren’t massive, but that’s no bad thing because the car was already good. The most significant change — and the one that’s going to get enthusiasts’ hearts pumping the most — is the addition of a six-speed manual transmission in the top Sport Touring trim level. If you know Honda, then you know that gearbox is going to be good.In addition to the six-speed manual, Honda is offering a CVT transmission, and with that choice, you get remote start. The Sport trim level also gets push-button ignition and keyless entry as standard.2020-honda-civic-hatchback-sport-touring-056Enlarge ImageThe interior of the 2020 Civic hatchback sports an updated infotainment system and typical Honda practicality. Honda Next, the big H made some slight adjustments to the vehicle’s styling; specifically, it gave the hatchback a more aggressive look in the front and rear. Now, it’s definitely not Civic Type R levels of aggression, but it suits the car quite well.Inside, Honda is using the dashboard trim to help differentiate between trim levels. For example, top-spec EX-L and Sport Touring get a brushed black finish while the Sport trim gets a geometric pattern. Also on deck is an upgraded Display Audio system which still offers physical controls and both Android Auto and Apple CarPlay integration.Pricing for the 2020 Civic hatchback ranges from $21,580 for the base LX model with the CVT transmission and $22,750 for the Sport trim with manual transmission to $29,780 for the Sport Touring model with CVT, and all are set to go on sale on Friday. 2019 Honda Civic Sedan: Small visual updates and friendlier tech More From Roadshow 2020 Mini JCW Clubman first drive: A fast alternative for the crossover-averse Preview • Apple CarPlay lets iOS take over a Mercedes-Benz Honda Tags 2 Share your voice News • 2018 Toyota Camry and Sienna eligible for Apple CarPlay, Amazon Alexa retrofit Hatchbacks Car Industry Honda 2020 Toyota 4Runner first drive: Same as it ever was — mostly 2020 Kia Soul review: Well-rounded box More about Apple CarPlay Comments Honda Civic Type R TCR is one serious $172,000 race car 4:41 Review • Apple CarPlay review: What’s it like after one month of heavy use? Now playing: Watch this: 63 Photoslast_img read more

Alwar mob lynching Pehlu Khan was not named in chargesheet clarifies Ashok

first_imgAnguri Begum, mother of late Pehlu Khan along with her family members stage a sit-in demonstration to demand justice for him in New Delhi, on April 19, 2017.IANSAmid the row broke over Alwar lynch mob victim Pehlu Khan being named in a charge sheet, Rajasthan Chief Minister Ashok Gehlot on Saturday (June 29) clarified that the killed dairy farmer’s name was not in the charge sheet submitted by the Rajasthan Police in December 2018.Asserting the fact that Congress is ideologically committed against any kind of lynching committed anywhere in the country, Gehlot, in a series of tweets, said that the “news reported in Indian Express is factually incorrect”. “Name of Late Pehlu Khan is not there in the chargesheet submitted by Rajasthan Police in December 2018. This is a separate case which was registered and investigated under previous government in 2017-18 against (Khan’s sons) Mr Arif, Mr Irshad and Mr Khan Mohd (Transporter),”.. since accused name in the chargesheet were not present at the time of the submission in December 2018, the District court accepted the Challan on 24th May 2019. However, our government will see if investigation was done with predetermined intentions,” tweeted Gehlot.Meanwhile, Behror SHO Sugandh Singh said that a charge sheet cannot be filed against a dead person, and this one named all those who were with Khan at the time. After investigation, a final file was prepared on December 30, 2018, which was submitted in court on May 24, he added.Asked if Khan was ever accused, the SHO said: “Those who investigated the case in 2018 can better reply if Pehlu Khan was declared accused in their probe.”Pehlu Khan’s family was shocked at these developments.His elder son Irshad said: “Our family is quite disappointed to know this. We were hoping that Congress government will withdraw the case against us but it’s shocking to know that they have filed a charge sheet”.”We were expecting justice from Congress government in the state. However, this charge sheet has come like a shock.”Khan was beaten to death on the Jaipur-Delhi Highway in Alwar in April 2017 while he and his sons were bringing cattle bought from a fair in Jaipur to their home in Haryana’s Nuh.(With agency inputs)last_img read more

Plastic products could easily become electronic with first moldable allcarbon circuits

Plastic products could easily become electronic with first moldable allcarbon circuits

first_img More information: Dong-Ming Sun, et al. “Mouldable all-carbon integrated circuits.” Nature Communications. (2013) DOI: 10.1038/ncomms3302Dong-Ming Sun, et al. “Flexible high-performance carbon nanotube integrated circuits.” Nature Nanotechnology. (2011) DOI: 10.1038/nnano.2011.1 © 2013 Phys.org. All rights reserved. (Left) All-carbon device fabricated on a flexible polymer substrate. (Right) The ON and OFF currents of the all-carbon transistor for different bending levels. Credit: Sun, et al. ©2013 Macmillan Publishers Limited The new circuits are composed of different types of carbon materials, with the active channels and passive elements consisting of carbon nanotubes, and the dielectric layers and substrates consisting of the plastic polymers polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and polyethylene naphthalate (PEN), respectively. Journal information: Nature Communications In a new study, researchers have for the first time developed integrated circuits that are composed entirely of flexible carbon-based materials, and can be molded into various shapes using the same molding techniques used for shaping plastic products. The development could allow electronic circuits to be easily integrated into a variety of plastic products, including everything from medical devices to plastic products around the home.”The plastic cases of smart phones and tablets, which are just protecting the electronic devices inside, will have electronic functions such as displays, touch sensors, and so on, making smart phones more functional and fashionable,” Yutaka Ohno of Nagoya University in Japan and Aalto University in Finland told Phys.org. “By integrating other functions such as displays and sensors into plastic devices, we are thinking of developing 3D interactive information communication devices, which can be used in medical settings, for example.”Ohno, along with Dong-Ming Sun of Nagoya University and their coauthors, have published a paper on the moldable all-carbon integrated circuits in a recent issue of Nature Communications.”The key point in our design is that the all-carbon devices are made of carbon nanotubes and polymers, and they exhibit better flexibility and stretchability compared with devices fabricated from rigid metals and oxide insulators, making the devices much more flexible and elastic,” Sun said. “The results of this study make it possible to achieve a fusion of electronic devices with plastic products, which can lead to the creation of plastic electronic devices that feature both designability and functionality.” Carbon nanotube transistors could lead to inexpensive, flexible electronics (Phys.org) —There has been a great deal of research lately on flexible electronics, but so far these devices (which are mostly made of carbon) still use metal electrodes and oxide insulators, and these rigid materials limit device flexibility. Some polymers and ionic liquids have been introduced as flexible alternatives, but have poor performance in terms of high operating voltages and low operating speeds, respectively.center_img Citation: Plastic products could easily become electronic with first moldable all-carbon circuits (2013, August 23) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-08-plastic-products-easily-electronic-moldable.html (Left) A dome-shaped all-carbon device (scale bar, 10 mm). Inset: magnified photograph (scale bar, 1 mm). (Right) Illustration of the cross-section of the air-assisted thermopressure-forming apparatus used to mold the all-carbon device. Credit: Sun, et al. ©2013 Macmillan Publishers Limited Unlike the polymers and ionic liquids that have been previously tried as materials for flexible dielectrics, the PMMA that the researchers used here can enable transistors and integrated circuits to operate at low voltages and high speeds. The low operating voltage can be explained in part by the sparse, network-like carbon nanotube thin film used as the channels, which enhances coupling between the channel and gate electrode compared with using thick polymers as the channels.Previously, the researchers successfully fabricated a thin-film transistor with a mobility greater than 600 cm2V-1s-1 by developing a technology for forming a long, yet pure, carbon nanotube film on plastic. In the new study, the researchers made further progress on the optimization of the film-forming technology, achieving a mobility of 1,027 cm2V-1s-1. This mobility is higher than that of a MOSFET, which uses monocrystalline silicon, and the researchers describe it as an astonishing value for a thin-film transistor fabricated on a plastic substrate.Because these all-carbon devices are made of carbon nanotubes and polymers, they exhibit better flexibility and stretchability compared with devices fabricated from rigid metals and oxide insulators. Perhaps the most useful feature of the all-carbon circuits is their moldability, which the researchers demonstrated by heating and blowing a planar substrate to form a dome-shaped structure. The 3D dome is stretched during this molding process without cracking, in sharp contrast to rigid materials such as metals. The extreme stretchability of both the passive and active elements of the devices can allow them to be formed using the same molding techniques used today to shape plastic products. In order to scale up the devices, the researchers note that it will be important to grow carbon nanotubes with a uniform length and diameter to minimize current variation. Eliminating metallic nanotubes can also offer further performance improvements. They also hope to use fabrication methods other than the lithographic methods they used here.”It is desirable to form carbon nanotube channels and wirings at atmospheric pressure and low temperature by high-throughput printing techniques rather than current lithographic techniques,” Sun said. Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. , Nature Nanotechnologylast_img read more