Global installed solar capacity tops wind for first time in latest BNEF data

first_imgGlobal installed solar capacity tops wind for first time in latest BNEF data FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Recharge:Solar energy stormed ahead last year to become the leading new power-generating source in the world, carrying clean-energy technologies including wind and hydro to overtake coal in global installed capacity, according to latest calculations by research consultancy BloombergNEF (BNEF).PV added 118GW of new plant in 2019 on its way to reaching 651GW of capacity, outpacing wind’s total 644GW, to become the fourth largest power source on the planet, behind coal’s 2.1TW, gas’ 1.8TW and hydro’s 1.2TW.Solar and wind together accounted for 67% of new capacity added globally in 2019, while fossil fuels slid to 25%, according to BNEF’s new Power Transition Trends 2020 report, which tracks capacity and generation data over the past decade. Taken together with hydro dams, the clean-energy sector has built out some 2.5TW of plant worldwide.“Sharp declines in solar equipment costs, namely the modules that go on rooftops and in fields, have made this technology widely available for homes, businesses and grids,” said Luiza Demôro, BNEF analyst and lead author of the study. “PV is now truly ubiquitous and a worldwide phenomenon.”PV eclipsed all-comers in new-build terms and was the most popular technology deployed in 33% of nations, with 81 countries building at least 1MW of solar during the last calendar year and representing nearly half of all new power generation capacity constructed worldwide.Renewable-energy engines wind and solar totted up to over two-thirds of the 265GW of additional capacity deployed worldwide in 2019, up from less than a quarter of new plant in 2010, while for the first time the two technologies accounted for the majority of new generation recorded.[Darius Snieckus]More: Solar outshines wind to become world’s biggest new power source: BNEFlast_img read more

Belize Fights Transnational Organized Crime

first_imgBy Geraldine Cook/Diálogo April 22, 2019 Diverse ecological jungles, high mountains, pine forests, exotic rivers, and sandy beaches attract tourists to Belize year round. While visitors enjoy the beautiful landscape, drug smugglers look for ways to carry out illegal activities in the thick rainforest or along the coastline. The Belize Defence Force (BDF) works around the clock to stop drug traffickers from using its territory as a transshipment point. They’re aware that criminal networks could undermine the tourist industry and fuel violence inside the country. “Belize is a transshipment route for drugs,” said Brigadier General Steven Ortega, commander of BDF. “Gangs are fighting to be in charge of moving the drugs through Belize. Drug trafficking is one of the catalysts that fuels violent crime, weapons smuggling, and human smuggling, among other crimes in our country.” According to the U.S. Department of State’s 2018 International Narcotics Control Strategy Report, Belize is susceptible to the transshipment of illegal drugs due to its position along the Central American isthmus, its relatively uninhabited terrain, and hundreds of cayes (small islands) off its coast. “Drug-trafficking organizations predominantly use maritime and air routes through Belize,” said the report. Interagency cooperation BDF is not alone in this fight. With two infantry battalions, a support battalion, and air and maritime components, the force works with interagency units and international partners to try to dismantle criminal transnational networks and their illicit trades. “We do interagency work with the Joint Intelligence and Operations Center, which coordinates the operations, deployment, and movements of the troops. If there is a drug operation, we work together with the Coast Guard, police, and other agencies,” said Brig. Gen. Ortega. “We also coordinate with partner nations in the region, mainly with the United States, Mexico, and Guatemala.” As part of the effort, participants share information to communicate about any suspected aircraft flying into Belize or the region. The shared information results in counter narcotics successes. “We’ve had success seizing several aircrafts,” said BDF Major Adran Claude Ramírez, commander of the Air Wing and Special Boats Units. “On September 2018, we caught a Cessna 2010 single-engine plane that landed on a dirt road of the Orange Walk district, located in the northern part of the country; the plane was loaded with drugs and five people were arrested.” Authorities found 1,225 pounds of cocaine inside the plane, worth $7 million. “In the same district, we found a Hawker Siddeley 225 jet that landed on a dirt road in April 2018. The plane had traces of drugs,” said Maj. Ramírez. The authorities found the jet without passenger seats, possibly to be used as space for cargo, and speculated the pilots set the aircraft’s wings on fire. “We are working diligently to get as many seizures and drug busts as we can. We have a crew ready to move—fixed wing, rotary wing, or the boat unit—at any time and location.” According to BDF Captain Jasmine Elliot, an officer with the Special Boats Unit, BDF’s focus is on stopping criminal organizations from hiding marijuana or cocaine in small boats that travel through the jungle, where rivers facilitate a corridor for illicit trafficking. “We have been able to deter people from trafficking, usually small amounts of drugs and contraband to Mexico.” Strong partnership Belize and U.S. Southern Command (SOUTHCOM) are partners in the fight to counter transnational organized crime in the region. The United States supports BDF by providing training, humanitarian assistance programs, and combined exercises. “SOUTHCOM helps us in the fight against transnational organized crime,” said Brig. Gen. Ortega. “They provide resources and support such as equipment, technology, and training.” As part of their combined operations, the U.S. Embassy Military Liaison Office and Joint Task Force-Bravo collaborate in marijuana eradication operations. “The partnership between SOUTHCOM and BDF is a positive and mutually supportive relationship that’s growing, and it will persist throughout the future,” said U.S. Army Lieutenant Colonel Eldridge Singleton, the Security Cooperation officer at U.S. Embassy, Belize. “This is a long-standing relationship that provides great partnership, opportunities for training, share lessons, learn from each other, and improves security for the region.” The partnership between BDF and SOUTHCOM goes beyond counter-narcotics operations. “The government of Belize and BDF show their willingness to be involved in disaster response and assisting regional partners in dealing with crisis, whether it be a natural disaster, man-made disaster, or illicit threats from bad actors,” added Lt. Col. Singleton. State Partnership Program The Louisiana Army National Guard and BDF are linked under the U.S. National Guard’s State Partnership Program (SPP), since1996. During the 23-year partnership, they built military capabilities and coordinated interagency operations, among other efforts. “[The partnership] started out as strictly military-to-military exchanges—from personnel matters, logistics, advanced training—to helping in their training to be infantry men, engineers, or aviators; now we work with the Coast Guard, have new training exercises, and are involved with things like health and the Youth Challenge Program,” said Major General Glenn H. Curtis, adjutant general for the Louisiana National Guard. “Our strong relationship with Belize helps us as a nation to train and build allies that we can help to keep democracy around the world.” BDF’s leadership highlights the importance of regional bonds to defeat organized crime. “It takes interagency efforts and regional cooperation to turn the tide of the increasing transnational threat,” concluded Brig. Gen. Ortega. “It’s the only way that we can succeed in deterring and putting a lid on the transnational threats that come into our country.”last_img read more

Sanders wins Nevada caucus with broad support from Hispanics

first_imgBernie Sanders won the Nevada caucus Saturday, cementing his place as front-runner of the crowded field of Democratic presidential contenders.Sanders had a sizable lead in the initial vote counting. Joe Biden trailed but was holding in second place, which marked a rebound for him from embarrassing losses in Iowa and New Hampshire.Sanders claimed victory from San Antonio, Texas, noting the diverse coalition that gave him the win. Sanders, a self-described democratic socialist, also dominated caucus-goers who describe themselves as very liberal or somewhat liberal, well ahead of his progressive rival Elizabeth Warren. He was even ahead with those who said they were moderate or conservative, with 25 percent support, edging Biden, who had 23 percent.Two thirds of Nevada caucus-goers said they preferred a single-payer health system like Sanders’ Medicare for All. Sanders won about 49 percent of those voters, according to entrance polls.Biden took the stage in Las Vegas and called his second-place standing a win. He said he would seize the momentum and win in South Carolina next week.“I’m a Democrat for a simple reason. I ain’t a socialist, I ain’t a plutocrat. I’m a Democrat. And I’m proud of it,” he said. “I think it’s time we get moving. I think it’s time we unite the party first.”Buttigieg, who was in third place in early results, also called for party unity, but not behind Sanders, whose strict progressivism he said “leaves out most Democrats, not to mention most Americans.”“Before we rush to nominate Senator Sanders as our one shot to take on this president, let’s take a sober look at what’s at stake,” the former mayor said.“I believe the only way to truly deliver any of the progressive changes we care about is to be a nominee who actually gives a damn about the effect you are having, from the top of the ticket, on those crucial, front-line House and Senate Democrats running to win, who we need to win, to make sure our agenda is more than just words on a page,” he said.Nevada’s caucus comes on the heels of the Iowa debacle, which left everyone waiting days for final results. And while Nevada party officials took pains to avoid a repeat, the results came in slowly and it may take a while before it’s clear how many delegates Sanders and the others won.At stake are 36 pledged delegates to the national convention of the 1,991 needed to secure the party’s nomination. More important than delegates, each win gives candidates momentum going into later contests.President Donald Trump’s campaign was already relishing the prospect of facing Sanders in the fall.“There is no denying that big government socialism dominated again as Bernie Sanders remained the leader of the leftist pack,” said a statement from Brad Parscale, Trump campaign manager.There were two late developments in the days before the caucuses: A feisty Democratic debate and a report that intelligence officials briefed the Sanders campaign on Russian efforts to help his candidacy.The impact of those events was likely blunted by Nevada’s first caucus early voting. Almost 75,000 people – including 10,000 newly registered Democrats – voted beginning last weekend.Buttigieg is the only other Democrat who’s won a contest, with his narrow victory in Iowa. Biden and Warren finished far back in the pack in the first two contests, and both were seeking strong results to springboard into the 14 races on March 3 – states that include Texas, North Carolina, Minnesota and the biggest prize: California.Warren had hoped her strong debate performance this week in Las Vegas would inspire Democrats to give her a second look. Her main target that night, Michael Bloomberg, didn’t contest Nevada but is spending unprecedented sums on advertising on states voting after South Carolina. (Bloomberg is the founder and majority owner of Bloomberg LP, the parent company of Bloomberg News.)This year, Nevada allowed for early voting in which people could rank their top three candidates, with the option of ranking up to five. About 77,000 Nevadans filled out ballots early. The number of early voters was almost as many as the total who caucused in 2016, when 84,000 people came out to support a candidate.One thing Saturday’s vote will not settle is where Bloomberg – and his hundreds of millions of dollars – will land in the Democratic race. He is not on the ballot in Nevada, although he appeared in the most recent debate there by getting more than 10 percent in four national polls.The former New York mayor has already dropped more than $468 million on advertising around the country and despite a widely panned debate performance, will be a factor in the race once he appears on ballots starting on Super Tuesday, March 3.Topics : “In Nevada we have just put together a multi-generational, multiracial coalition which is not going to only win in Nevada, it’s going to sweep this country,” he said.Nevada was the third straight contest in which Sanders won the popular vote. Five other candidates split the half of voters who were not supporting Sanders, making it difficult for them to win the 15 percent minimum support needed to win delegates.Entrance polls broadcast on CNN suggest Sanders had broad support across almost all demographic groups – especially Latinos, which gave him 53 percent support. Biden won among Nevada Democrats 65 and older and among African Americans.Sanders also took two-thirds of voters under 30 and nearly half of people between 30 and 44 years old, the entrance polls showed.last_img read more

Hughes: Big Ten media day notebook

first_imgCHICAGO – It may not be as popular of a nickname as “Windy City” or “Second City,” but Chicago is sometimes called the “City of the Big Shoulders.” And there are plenty of them walking around for the Big Ten football media days.After listening to the dozen of Big Ten coaches (as well as the commissioner himself) field questions from a ballroom of reporters. Here’s a little notebook of highlights from day one:Bielema denounces NCAA violatorsThe increasing amount of schools getting tied up in NCAA violations was a topic that kept reappearing all day Thursday and when it was Wisconsin head coach Bret Bielema’s turn to comment on the matter, he expressed a no-tolerance policy – and an extreme distaste – for those who willingly and knowingly commit infractions.“When you consciously break an NCAA rule, to me the only way to deter that is to get rid of people, or seriously hold programs accountable,” Bielema said. “That’s probably the number one thing I would love to see happen in the world of college football.”“If someone knowingly and willingly violates a rule, I don’t see anything wrong with a substantial penalty. What that [penalty] is, I’ll let other people decide.”Although he didn’t venture a specific kind of sanction, Bielema was the most candid coach to speak on NCAA violations. I think the amount of scandals that have been revealed over the past couple years (in football and basketball) has made many college sports fans second-guess the integrity of their favorite teams. And given Bielema’s stance on the matter, however non-specific it may ultimately be, it would seem like he has nothing to hide.You don’t see many coaches of BCS schools speaking that way, so hopefully we don’t catch him hiding any emails in the future. He’ll be eating his own words if he does.Wilson update Bielema was unable to speak much about the progress of Wisconsin’s new transfer quarterback Russell Wilson, since, per NCAA rules, he has not been able to coach him yet. But after talking to wide receiver Nick Toon and safety Aaron Henry, who accompanied their head coach to Chicago, Bielema was able to report that Wilson formed a bond with Henry and that he attended summer workouts with diligence.“Everybody told me… he just showed up and went to work and worked as hard as anybody else to prove he was a valuable member of our team,” Bielema said.Bielema also remained insistent that, despite the excitement surrounding Wilson, the quarterback position is, as of this moment, entirely up for grabs.“I haven’t seen Russell Wilson compete one snap competitively in practice,” he said. “I think I might know what will happen, but until it happens, that’s where we’re at.”Delany casts a warning In reaction to the violations recently exposed at Ohio State, mixed with Michigan’s run-in with the NCAA involving unofficial practices prior to the 2009 season, Big Ten commissioner Jim Delany informed the media that he held a meeting with all 12 conference coaches Thursday morning to “make clear to them what our expectations are.”Delany called the two above-mentioned violations particularly “embarrassing” for the conference. And with so much misconduct – 14 incidents, by Delany’s count – coming to light in the past year across the nation, he referenced the shadow of doubt it has placed on all other schools.“I think that the 14 struggles that have come under scrutiny in the last year raise legitimate questions in people’s minds about who is sponsoring these [athletic] programs and what do these programs stand for,” he said. “I can’t remember a period of time where we’ve had more questions about various programs, where it be on the agent side, the recruitment side, or the academic side. We’ve had two of them in this conference, and that’s two too many, as far as I’m concerned.’Delany’s stern voice made it sound pretty clear to me that he’s done with shenanigans.Fickell braces himself Where once stood The Vest now stands Luke Fickell, Ohio State’s interim head coach following the tattoo fiasco.In addressing the media, he didn’t appear nervous at the podium, just well prepared for the room of reporters to get their pecks in. Over the last few “crazy” and “emotional” months, he said he hasn’t had “a whole lot” of contact with the ousted Jim Tressel and has not received any instruction, implied or up front, about avoiding him.After facing a public relations nightmare and with the hammer of the NCAA looming above his inherited program (if only for a year), a few phrases kept popping up as Fickell answered questions. Phrases like: “stability,” “foundation,” “moving forward,” “starting from day one,” and “focusing on what we can control.”It’s about as much as you can expect from a guy in his situation.Elliot is a senior majoring in journalism. Are you licking your chops for the new-look Big Ten season to begin? Let him know at ehughes@badgerherald.com.last_img read more

Mallard’s Team of the Week — Jackson’s Hole Mixed Slopitch Champs

first_imgAll season Jackson’s Hole remained quietly close to the top of the Nelson Mixed Slopitch League. However, when playoff time came around the eventual champs put the gear in overdrive to capture its 15th Nelson Mixed Slopitch League title in the past 19 years Sunday at the Lakeside Ball Diamonds.Jackson’s built up a 13-0 lead en route to a 13-3 victory over Louie’s in the A-division final.Staff and management at Mallard’s Source for Sports needed all but a few seconds to select this week’s Team of the Week winner. Jackson’s Hole team includes, back row, L-R, Justin Willans, Kent Smith, Mick Roch, Jackson Slomba and Jarred Slomba.Middle, Al Faraguna, Melanie Faraguna, Michelle Lelievre, Rachael Stewart, Luree Gould, Rob Chernenko, and coach Joe Caprilione and Tanis Bouchier- Willans. Front, Abby Bouchier- Willans, Hayley Slomba, Andrew Falcone, Cole Laughton and Mike Laughton. Missing, Lorne Wuori, Vanessa Sapatch, Jayden Roch and Adam Wheeldon.last_img read more