Reds ‘don’t intend to sell Suarez’

first_img Press Association “Okay, we might not be in the Champions League and haven’t been for a while now but our competitors have grown around us and we have to step up to the challenge now. “Would it be a mistake for Luis to leave? 100 per cent. The team was built around Luis last season. It is difficult for Luis, I understand that. If a team wants you, it can be difficult.” Liverpool have been followed by big crowds throughout their pre-season trip to Indonesia and Australia, and Thailand this week looks to be no different. Rodgers hopes that is something that will help get the message home. He said: “I am sure Luis will have seen the sheer size and status of the club, so we’ll just see how it goes. It is not something we want to run on too long.” The Reds have rejected bids of £30million and £40m plus £1 from Arsenal, while the wantaway forward has also been linked with Real Madrid. Suarez has made clear in a series of interviews since the end of last season that he wants to leave Anfield, but the Merseysiders are not willing to sell the controversial Uruguay international. Liverpool managing director Ian Ayre has reiterated the club’s determination to keep striker Luis Suarez. Ayre, speaking at a press conference in Bangkok during the club’s pre-season tour, told reporters: “The situation with Luis Suarez remains the same. It’s never been our intention to sell Luis. “As has been widely reported in the media we’ve received two separate offers from Arsenal for the player and we’ve rejected those offers. “Luis remains a Liverpool player and is here with us in Thailand as part of our squad.” Suarez was allowed an extended summer break after his involvement in the Confederations Cup with Uruguay but joined the Liverpool squad in Australia earlier this week. He appeared as a substitute in Wednesday’s game against Melbourne Victory and has been training ahead of the next pre-season fixture against Thailand on Sunday. Liverpool manager Brendan Rodgers believes Suarez, 26, would be making a mistake by moving to Arsenal. Rodgers, quoted in several newspapers, said: “I know what we are trying to build and grow, so why would you swap Liverpool to go to Arsenal? “I am not sure that it adds up, to be honest. Arsenal has a wonderful history in its own right but Liverpool is one of the biggest clubs in the world. last_img read more

Former USC football players begin NFL careers

first_imgChuma Edoga was a full-time starter for two years at USC and appeared in 34 games throughout his college career. Now a Jet, he will reunite with former USC quarterback Sam Darnold in New York. This preseason, Edoga has seen increased action with Darnold and the starting unit due to an injury to starting right tackle Brandon Shell. Edoga’s chemistry with Darnold should help him learn the Jets’ blocking schemes quickly and allow him to communicate effectively throughout his rookie year. Edoga is projected to be a backup offensive tackle and has a chance to see the field this year if the Jets’ offensive line should suffer any injuries. However, he will need to improve his pass protection before becoming a full-time starter in the NFL.  Throughout its history, the Trojans’ storied football program has sent more players to the NFL than all but one other school in the nation. This year, USC has continued to establish itself as a breeding ground for NFL-bound talent, as four Trojans were drafted into the league and one signed as an undrafted free agent. OT Chuma Edoga The leading tackler for USC’s defense in 2018, Cameron Smith was drafted by the Vikings in the fifth round, joining star linebackers Anthony Barr and Eric Kendricks in Minnesota. Smith is a high-IQ player adept at diagnosing offensive calls and seeking out the ball carrier. His highest tackle total for USC (112) came in 2017, when he played in all 14 games. In his three other seasons as a Trojan, he averaged just over 80 tackles a season. Smith is still battling to make the Vikings’ 53-man roster this year, and it wouldn’t be a shock if he does, but he is unlikely to see significant game action this season.  Round 3, Pick 92 Overall  LB Porter Gustin Former USC cornerback Iman Marshall, who was drafted by the Baltimore Ravens, makes a tackle against Washington State last season. (Tal Volk/Daily Trojan) CB Iman Marshall At USC, Marvell Tell III proved to be a playmaking free safety whose speed could help him make an impact at any level. In his junior year, Tell made 85 tackles and had three interceptions, returning one for a touchdown. Indianapolis drafted Tell intending to use him as a safety, but teams were wary about taking him due to his smaller stature, believing him unable to be a consistent tackler. Tell earned a spot in Pro Football Focus’ “Team of the Week” after allowing no receptions on two targets and breaking up one pass in the Colts’ preseason opener. He will continue to be a promising prospect that Indianapolis will hope to develop into a contributing corner in the near future. Iman Marshall was a four-year starter at the cornerback position for USC. As a Trojan, the 6-foot-1 207-pounder was known as a big hitter and never shied away from contact with smaller Pac-12 receivers. In the NFL, he may struggle guarding faster, more disciplined wideouts one-on-one. The Ravens have considered transitioning him to safety, where his physical style and experience as a cornerback should certainly benefit him. Marshall is not projected to have a starting role in Week 1 but will be on the team’s radar throughout the year. Marshall has been sidelined due to injury.  Indianapolis Colts New York Jetscenter_img Minnesota Vikings LB Cameron Smith  CB Marvell Tell III  Round 5, Pick 162 Overall  Round 6, Pick 144 Overall  Undrafted Free Agent Round 4, Pick 127 Overall Baltimore Ravens  New Orleans Saints At USC, Gustin was a dominant outside linebacker with a knack for getting to the quarterback. However, his injury history and a positive test for Adderall (considered a performance-enhancing drug) at the 2019 NFL combine caused his once-promising draft stock to plummet, and Gustin was not selected. The Saints picked him up hoping to convert him from outside linebacker to defensive lineman. Gustin played defensive end in 2016 for the Trojans and picked up 68 total tackles, 5.5 sacks and four deflected passes. He may have to bulk up for the position change; while his 6’4” stature is average for NFL defensive ends, his weight of 260 lbs would put him at a disadvantage against massive offensive linemen. Gustin has seen valuable action throughout the preseason and tallied a sack and tackle in the Saints’ matchup against the Jets. Gustin is unlikely to see much regular season game action this year.last_img read more

‘The big leagues’: Looking back at SU’s 5 years in the ACC

first_img“He hates NC State,” Hunt said. “Every time we play them it’s, ‘This one’s for you coach.’”After the game, the Orange’s first ACC win — the Orange bested the Wolfpack 24-10 — Hunt and his teammates handed Hicks the game ball. He was in tears.SU field hockey had a similar moment of glory, this time on the biggest stage. Manley said she, former goalkeeper Jess Jecko and Emma Russell had discussed winning a championship since freshman year. In Manley’s freshman year playing in the Big East, SU played UNC in the nonconference. The Tar Heels, a fast-paced team that always seemed to hover at the top, was her first peek at an ACC opponent, and the Orange found themselves a target.Three years later, after years playing in the snow for practice, Manley, Jecko and her teammates all fought smirks as the clock dwindled down from 30 seconds on a “below freezing,” Manley said, Nov. 22 day. The Orange defeated UNC, 4-2, for the national championship, toppling a program it had targeted years earlier. Manley and Jecko dropped to the ground and cried, their dream realized.Katherine Sotelo | Staff PhotographerRoos Weers (left) and Lies Lagerweij hold up head coach Ange Bradley after winning the national championship.Throughout five years in the ACC, SU’s tenure is highlighted by shining moments — more recently, SU football’s wins over defending national champion Clemson in 2017 and Virginia Tech in 2016.As Cooney recollects his time, he can’t help but think back to that charge call. His best ACC moment was beating Duke at Cameron Indoor the following year. The sting of the loss set the tone for the games ahead, and the game was the beginning of something greater.Five years into the tenure, Gross looks ahead five more.“I think there’s a beautiful platform there to be terrific,” Gross said. “In five years, they should be looking pretty good.”CLARIFICATION: The $25.3 million dollar conference payout by the ACC in 2017 was reported by Syracuse.com CORRECTION: In a previous version of this post, Darryl Dockery was missnamed. The Daily Orange regrets this error.  UPDATED: Aug. 27, 2018 at 7:05 p.m.A split second before one of the most infamous moments in Syracuse history, Trevor Cooney hopped. The then-redshirt sophomore slipped into the corner and followed the play as CJ Fair made a quick move toward the baseline in the final seconds against Duke on Feb. 22, 2014.“It all happened so fast,” Cooney said.As Cooney settled in the corner, Fair rose up, and with his right hand, put the shot in. Fair’s momentum carried him into Cooney’s chest. Without realizing the whistle that had signaled a charge, called off the basket and sent SU head coach Jim Boeheim into a frenzy, Cooney had instinctively begun a celebration that would be cut off almost immediately.The Duke fans screamed in response to the call. Cooney — who had spent two seasons as a member of a Syracuse Big East squad— was now firmly in the thick of Atlantic Coast Conference basketball. Leaving behind the history and tradition of the Big East following SU’s move in 2013 was not easy. It even bothered SU’s then-athletics director Daryl Gross.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textSince the move, Syracuse athletic teams have won two national championships (field hockey and men’s cross country), 13 team ACC championships and 17 individual ACC championships. The men’s basketball team has made three trips to the Sweet 16, with two of the trips ending in the Final Four (2014 and 2016). SU received a school-record $25.3 million conference payout by the ACC in 2017, per Syracuse.com.Still, Cooney wonders if Fair’s play was a block or a charge. He still watches the play now and realizes it could have easily gone the other way. The Orange were in the midst of a record-breaking season where they began 25-0. A win at Cameron Indoor Stadium could have swept the season series against the historic Duke team in SU’s first year in the new conference.In the Big East, the Orange played many of their games in NBA arenas, Cooney said. But in Cameron Indoor, he said the on-campus environment elevates the game.After realizing the impact of the play, Cooney walked back with his hands help atop his head. Suddenly, it all felt real.“We’re leaving a really good conference to go to another really good conference,” Cooney said. “Nothing changed.”Daily Orange File PhotoFormer Syracuse center Rakeem Christmas blocks a shot during a game against Duke in 2014.‘Crumbling Island’In 2005, the Big East expanded to 16 teams following a mass college-basketball conference realignment. Questions immediately emerged about its sustainability due to the lack of a TV contract, former SU athletics director Daryl Gross said.Gross listened to phone calls inquiring about SU’s future conference home. An offer from the Big 10 was on the table for SU, and the Big 12’s new media deal paved the way for negotiations within the Big East. The Big East made an offer that Gross was ready to accept.“It could have been the power-six,” Gross said referring to the famed Power Five structure.But underlying problems within the Big 12’s reported deal caused the Big East’s plans to fizzle. Gross said the Big 12’s reported figure for its conference TV deal included the individual media deals from the schools within the conference, which significantly raised the value of the agreement. When Big East teams tried to hold out, the conference slowly pulled away. To understand the financial aspects of the deal, Gross would frequently talk on the phone with current SU athletics director John Wildhack — then an ESPN executive with an expansive knowledge of media deals.But the Big East had history and tradition Syracuse was leaving behind. A move would be for money. “Let’s be honest,” former SU lineman Omari Palmer said. “It was 100 percent about money.”“That, to me, was a really challenging time. Because most people wouldn’t understand the move,” Gross said. “Breaking up tradition like that is never something that someone wants to see.”“Do you stay here on this crumbling island?” Gross added.SU had to do what was right: for the business, for sustainability, for the future of SU Athletics.Anna Henderson | Digital Design EditorIn late 2011, Gross received a call from ACC executives. A board meeting would take place in Beverly Hills, California, that weekend. The school could vote on and declare its intentions to move conferences. The whole process took just one week, two weeks tops, Gross said.Gross maintains that the move was the right decision, and staying put would have been “horrendous.” The Big East wasn’t the same — West Virginia, Pittsburgh, Notre Dame, Louisville, Rutgers and Connecticut all eventually followed Syracuse out.Gross brought up Connecticut as an example. A strong program before the realignment, going to the American Athletic Conference was a far less lucrative move than Syracuse’s move to the ACC and didn’t provide the same financial boost. Following the move, Syracuse increased operational budgets, coaching salaries and its academic profile. Palmer said transport and hotels for away games improved.“We were built for championships,” Gross said, “but now this gives us an even better chance.”Learning to competeCharlottesville, Virginia; Durham, North Carolina; Tallahassee, Florida. Suddenly, Syracuse was thrust into a conference which had something it always lacked: warm weather.“I don’t think it’s ever easy to bring someone up to Syracuse,” Palmer said. “You have these kids from Syracuse who’ve never seen snow, and when you come to Syracuse, you’re going to see a lot of snow.”The Orange sold players on the idea of traveling to southern states to play. Indoor practice facilities like Ensley Athletic Center allowed more development in temperature controlled areas, but former SU field hockey player Alyssa Manley said some of the field hockey practices are in the snow.To compete in recruiting, former SU quarterback Terrell Hunt said the Orange embraced a bit of an underdog role. If players came to Syracuse, despite playing in the ACC, there would be an opportunity to play. Manley said the Orange did best when the recruits came and met the team.SU athletes were now Power Five athletes. Hunt remembers one phone conversation with his step dad, Darryl Dockery. Due to distance, it was difficult for Dockery to watch Hunt play.“Hey, how would it sound if you could watch more of me on national TV?” Hunt remembered he asked.“That would be great,” Dockery responded.“Well, we’re moving to the ACC.”On Oct. 12, a cold and rainy day, the conditions didn’t give Hunt much to work with against NC State. His throws were off, and the rain seemingly never stopped. Still, the Orange found success through the running game.Will Hicks, SU football’s former strength and conditioning coach and current executive coordinator of the Varsity Club and athletic alumni engagement, is a graduate of NC State and worked there for 10 years after leaving school. Hicks thought the Wolfpack would give him a new job, Hunt recalled. They didn’t. Published on August 26, 2018 at 11:26 pm Contact Michael: mmcclear@syr.edu | @MikeJMcClearycenter_img Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

Déjà vu presents from Nina to Lauryn

first_imgIn an effort to highlight the arduous journey traversed by the balck female musician and performer, Déjà Vu Theatre Productions Inc will present a jazz concert honoring two of Black America’s greatest female ambassadors, Nina Simone and Lauryn Hill.The concert, which will be held at the Luxurious Banquet Hall in Lauderhill, Florida on May 6,  will feature two rising talents. Abia Cilon will be portraying Nina Simone and Tanya Marie Greaves will portray Lauryn Hill.The two young talents are students of jazz and music on a wiser scale and  will pay tribute in song to the two icons.Founder and President of the Caribbean/American-infused theater company known as Déjà Vu, Sharon Cummings, has a noble vision of uniting the Caribbean community and its non-Caribbean friends in one cause.From Nina to Simone will also serve as a fundraiser for the upcoming “Ms. Lou In Color” production for our annual tribute for Caribbean Heritage month.“We find that there are so many talented young people within our local community, but are lacking the opportunity of an outlet We at Déjà vu theatre provides that outlet that allows them to soar.  We do not always have to import the talents. Our community artist studied long and hard in honing their skills to pursue their dreams, these are our daughters, sons, nieces, nephews, cousins etc. Shouldn’t we at least support them?” Cummings said.We hope you will come out and support our effort in showcasing these wonderful performers, it will be a soulful evening, reflection on the struggle for acceptance and love.Master of ceremonies for the event will be Sophia Nicholson.last_img read more

ThurstonTalk Expands

first_imgDan Jones (left) and Martin McElliott lead the ThurstonTalk team.ThurstonTalk, buoyed by local readers and energetic customers, has expanded into new office space.“In the new West Olympia office space, our 25-person team can comfortably gather together to collaborate, strategize, and work on business development,” explains ThurstonTalk’s CEO Dan Jones.The past 18-months have shown constant growth for ThurstonTalk including recognition by the Thurston County Economic Development Council as the New Business of the Year in April.“A big thank you goes to The Rants Group who leased ThurstonTalk Class A office space in the Market Place building downtown,” adds Jones.  “The flexibility provided by the terms of our lease enabled ThurstonTalk to grow and prosper.”ThurstonTalk celebrates its two-year anniversary in October.  ThurstonTalk writes positive stories about people, businesses, and organizations doing good things in Thurston County.   Stories are published at www.thurstontalk.com and delivered to over 21,000 Facebook followers across two pages.  ThurstonTalk currently sees over 250,000 views per month across its platform. Facebook0Tweet0Pin0last_img read more