Awuku-Darkoh, Ricks, Guevara Garner Soccer Weekly Awards

first_imgDefensive Player of the Week: Kristen Ricks, Central Arkansas – Sr. – Keller, Texas Honorable Mention: April Trowbridge, Northwestern State; Katelyn Termini, Stephen F. Austin; Jessica Nevils, Houston Baptist; Jamie Raines, Southeastern Louisiana. Honorable Mention: Carli Arthurs, Stephen F. Austin; Baylii Bieke, Houston Baptist; Sofia Olsson, Southeastern Louisiana. FRISCO, Texas – Central Arkansas’ Connie Awuku-Darkoh and Kristen Ricks and Houston Baptist’s Alanis Guevara are the Southland Conference Soccer Players of the Week, the league announced Tuesday. Southland weekly awards are presented by MidSouth Bank. Awuku-Darkoh continued her recent hot streak, scoring a pair of goals in Central Arkansas’ Southland opener against Sam Houston State. The junior from Surrey, British Columbia, fielded a pass from Kristen Ricks and buried it inside the right post to start the scoring for the Bears in the 19th minute. She connected again in the 48th minute from a ball from Ricks again, winning a foot race to inside the box to tap one home from close range. In her last four games, including wins against teams from the SWAC, Sun Belt, Summit and the Southland conferences, Awuku-Darkoh has four goals and three assists. Guevara was a wall on Saturday, being called upon 10 times to make saves en route to the double-overtime shutout win over Abilene Christian. The clean sheet was the senior’s second of the season. The Cedar Park, Texas, native leads the league in total saves (52) and saves per game (6.50). The Bears’ duo of Awuku-Darkoh and Ricks linked up twice in Friday’s 5-0 win over Sam Houston State (1-6-1, 0-1 Southland) to commence the Southland season. UCA (6-2-1, 1-0) returns to the pitch Friday to face defending conference champion Lamar (4-3, 0-0) in Beaumont at 7 p.m. CT before staying on the road Sunday for a contest with McNeese (6-4, 0-1) at 1 p.m. Goalkeeper of the Week: Alanis Guevara, Houston Baptist – Sr. – Cedar Park, Texas Offensive Player of the Week: Connie Awuku-Darkoh, Central Arkansas – Jr. – Surrey, British Columbia Guevara opened the league slate with a 1-0 shutout victory between the pipes in 107 minutes of work against Abilene Christian (5-3, 0-1). The Huskies (3-5, 1-0) host Stephen F. Austin (3-3, 1-0) and Sam Houston this weekend, taking on the Ladyjacks on Friday and the Bearkats on Sunday. Both games are scheduled for 7 p.m.  Ricks proved her value to the Central Arkansas lineup on both sides of the ball in the team’s conference opener versus Sam Houston State. Posting the most minutes for the Bears’ backline, Ricks led a UCA defense that recorded its league-leading fifth shutout of the season. The senior from Keller, Texas, helped limit the Bearkats to just three shots on goal. She also made an impact on the UCA attack, pushing forward from her left back position to ignite Bears’ offense, twice playing balls to Connie Awuku-Darkoh for goals. Southland weekly award winners are nominated and voted upon by each school’s sports information director. Voting for one’s own athlete is not permitted. To earn honorable mention, a student-athlete must appear on 25 percent of ballots. Honorable Mention: Maddie Talbot, Stephen F. Austin; Lauren Mercuri, Central Arkansas; Nadine Maher, Southeastern Louisiana. last_img read more

This ancient bone belonged to a child of two extinct human species

first_img This ancient bone belonged to a child of two extinct human species THOMAS HIGHAM, UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe The bone fragment’s characteristics suggested it came from someone who was at least 13 years old. After pulverizing small samples, extracting DNA, and sequencing it, Slon and her colleagues found that its owner was female, and that her genome matched that of Denisovans and Neanderthals in roughly equal measure. Moreover, the proportion of genes in which her chromosome pairs harbored different variants—so-called heterozygous alleles—was close to 50% across all chromosomes, suggesting the maternal and paternal chromosomes came directly from different groups. And her mitochondrial DNA, which is inherited maternally, was uniformly Neanderthal, so the researchers concluded she was a first-generation hybrid of a Denisovan man and Neanderthal woman. The evidence “is so direct, we almost caught them in the act,” Pääbo says.A closer look at the genome suggests her father also had some Neanderthal ancestry, possibly several hundred generations back. And the woman’s Neanderthal genes are closer to those of a Neanderthal found in Croatia than those from remains found in the Siberian cave. That suggests distinct groups of Neanderthals migrated back and forth between western Europe and Siberia multiple times.Along the way, apparently, they freely spread their genes to outsiders. That highlights the question, Krause says, of why Denisovans and Neanderthals nevertheless remained genetically distinct groups. “Why don’t they come together as one population if they come together from time to time?” Geographic barriers probably played a role, he says, but researchers need more fossils with ancient DNA, from multiple sites, to understand the true legacy of these prehistoric couplings. The woman may have been just a teenager when she died more than 50,000 years ago, too young to have left much of a mark on her world. But a piece of one of her bones, unearthed in a cave in Russia’s Denisova valley in 2012, may make her famous. Enough ancient DNA lingered within the 2-centimeter fragment to reveal her startling ancestry: She was the direct offspring of two different species of ancient humans—neither of them ours. An analysis of the woman’s genome, reported in this week’s issue of Nature, indicates her mother was Neanderthal and her father was Denisovan, the mysterious group of ancient humans discovered in the same Siberian cave in 2011. It is the most direct evidence yet that various ancient humans mated with each other and had offspring.Based on other ancient genomes, researchers already had concluded that Denisovans, Neanderthals, and modern humans interbred in ice age Europe and Asia. The genes of both archaic human species are present in many people today. Other fossils found in the Siberian cave have shown that all three species lived there at different times. But the new finding “is sensational” just the same, says Johannes Krause, who studies ancient DNA at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History in Jena, Germany. “Now we have the love child of two different hominin groups, found where members of both groups have been found. It’s quite a lot of things happening in one cave through time.”Viviane Slon, a paleogeneticist at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, who did the ancient DNA analysis, says when she saw the results, her first reaction was disbelief. Only after repeating the experiment several times were she and her Leipzig colleagues—Svante Pääbo, Fabrizio Mafessoni, and Benjamin Vernot—convinced. That a direct offspring of the two ancient humans was found among the first few fossil genomes recovered from the cave suggests, Pääbo says, “that when these groups met, they actually mixed quite freely with each other.” Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)center_img This bone fragment harbors the most direct evidence yet of ancient interspecies mating. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country By Gretchen VogelAug. 22, 2018 , 1:00 PM Emaillast_img read more